Herbert Hopkins

Surname: Hopkins
Other names: Herbert
Other people in this story:
Frank Hopkins
Caroline Eliza Hopkins née Extance
Amy Gertrude Hopkins née Smith
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury, Dorset
South Africa
Malta
Gillingham, Kent
Whitworth Road, Woolwich, London
Motcombe, Shaftesbury, Dorset

Story:
Herbert Hopkins was born at Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 18th May 1876, the son of Frank Hopkins and Caroline Eliza Hopkins (née Extance). The family lived for some time at Steven's Building, King's Lane, Motcombe. In due time he became a Cabinet Maker. He married Amy Gertrude Smith at Gillingham, Kent, on 20th January 1905 and they went on to have six children. Herbert had previously enlisted on 15th October 1876 with the Royal Engineers and served in South Africa and Malta (Service No. 472). Prior to the First World War he held the Long Service & Good Conduct Medal, the 1899-1902 South Africa Medal with clasp 'Cape Colony', and the 1901-02 King's South Africa Medal with two clasps. He served from 1913 entirely in the UK. He had risen steadily in the non-commissioned ranks throughout his career, ending as Regimental Sergeant Major of the Royal Military Academy. He was described as an exemplary soldier on discharge on 15th June 1920 and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. His last known address was 82 Whitworth Road, Woolwich, London, per the 1939 Register, where he had resumed his occupation as a Cabinet Maker. He died in Woolwich in 1960.

Source: Based on previous research by Ken Baxter.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives

Henry Bradley

Surname: Bradley
Other names: Henry
Other people in this story:
Thomas Bradley
Sarah Ann Bradley
Minnie Ida Ethel Bradley née Wadham
Locations in this story:
Hartgrove, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Salterton, Wiltshire

Story:
Henry Bradley was born at Hartgrove, near Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 8th October 1887, the son of Thomas and Sarah Ann Bradley.  He enlisted on 8th April 1917 and joined the Royal Engineers becoming, in due time, a Lance Corporal.  (Service Nos. 226284 and WR/22327).  During his time he was attached to the 312 and later 319 Road Construction Company.  He was demobilized on 13th December 1919 and was awarded the Victory and British War Medals.  He married Minnie Ida Ethel Wadham on 22nd April 1920 and they went on to have two children.  His last known address, per the 1939 Register, was 4 Salterton Farm Cottages, Salterton, Wiltshire, where he was employed as a cowman.  Henry died on 9th August 1963.

Source: Based on original research by Ken Baxter.  

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Sixpenny Handley War Memorial

Arthur New

Surname: New
Other names: Arthur
Other people in this story:
Esan New
Ann New nee Sanger
Tom New
Margaret Ethel New née Hill
Joseph Rideout
Locations in this story:
Sixpenny Handley, Dorset
France & Flanders
Houplines Communal Cemetery Extension, Armentieres, France
Vale Farm, Sutton Waldron, Dorset
Dean End, Woodcutts, Sixpenny Handley, Dorset

Story:
Arthur New was born in 1877 in Sixpenny Handley and baptised there on 26th August, 1877. He was the son of Esan New, a Traction Engine Driver and Ann New (nee Sanger). His siblings included Tom New, born in 1895, who also died in the war. The family lived at Vale Farm, Sutton Waldron, Dorset. On 23rd December, 1907, Arthur married Margaret Ethel Hill at St. Giles Church, Uley, Stroud, Gloucestershire. They had four children: 3 girls and a boy. At the time of the 1911 Census he was working as a Traction Engine Driver and living at Dean End, Woodcutts, Sixpenny Handley, Dorset. His mother died in 1911 and his father in 1913. Arthur had enlisted on 9th March, 1899 and served with the Dorsetshire Regiment (Service No. 3987) and then the Royal Engineers. He was discharged from that engagement on 16th June, 1906, and placed on reserve. He was recalled to duty as a Gunner with the Royal Garrison Artillery but soon transferred as a Sapper to the Royal Engineers (Service No. 12918). He served in France & Flanders and was awarded the Victory, British War and 1914 Star medals. He died whilst serving with the 12th Field Company on 23rd March 1915 and was buried at Houplines Communal Cemetery Extension, Armentieres, France (grave id. III.C.15). He is remembered on the Sixpenny Handley War Memorial. His wife, Margaret, remarried Joseph Rideout on 2nd August, 1919.    

Images:
  • Sixpenny Handley War Memorial
  • Sixpenny Handley War Memorial

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Iwerne Minster War Memorial 3

Robert Ashby

Surname: Ashby
Other names: Robert
Other people in this story:
George Ashby
Katherine Ashby née Bucklar
Mary Jane Ashby née Smith
Mary Ashby
George Hector Ashby
Victor Colin Ashby
Locations in this story:
France & Flanders
Norfolk Cemetery, Becordel-Becourt, France
Elliston, Leicestershire
Iwerne Minster, Dorset
Becourt, Somme, France
Market Bosworth, Leicestershire
Child Okeford, Dorset

Story:
Robert Ashby was born in 1879 in Childe Okeford and baptised there on 25th May 1879. He was the son of George Ashby, a groom, and Katherine Ashby (née Bucklar). Though his parents lived in Iwerne Minster, Robert spent much of his life living in Market Bosworth (where his mother had been born). He found employment there as a coal miner. On 12 June 1905 he married Mary Jane Smith at the Baptist Chapel in Market Bosworth. They had three children from the marriage: Mary, George Hector and Victor Colin. At the time of the 1911 Census, he was working as a coal miner and living at Elliston, Leicestershire. His mother was living in Iwerne Minster.

He enlisted in London as a Sapper (Tunneller) with the 178th Company, Royal Engineers (Service No. 102813). He served in France and Flanders and was awarded the Victory, British War and 1915 Star medals. On 23rd Sept, 1915 he was slightly gassed and, after treatment, returned to duty only to be killed on 21st December 1915 at Becourt, Somme, France. He was buried at the Norfolk Cemetery, Becordel-Becourt, Somme, France (grave id. I.C.22). He is remembered on the Iwerne Minster War Memorial, Shaftesbury. His wife received a widow's pension of £1.02p per week for herself and the three children. She continued to live in Elliston, according to the 1939 Register.    

Images:
  • Names on Iwerne Minster War Memorial 2
  • Iwerne Minster War Memorial 4
  • Iwerne Minister War Memorial 1
  • Iwerne Minster War Memorial 03
  • Iwerne Minster War Memorial 02

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Enmore Green War Memorial 02

Albert Brine

Surname: Brine
Other names: Albert
Other people in this story:
John Brine
Louisa Brine née Prior
Frank Brine
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury
France & Flanders
Staglieno Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
Sherborne Causeway, Enmore Green
Enmore Green, Shaftesbury
Italy
St. John's Church, Enmore Green
11th General Hospital, Genoa

Story:
Albert Brine was born in 1887 in Shaftesbury and baptised at St. John's Church, Enmore Green on 20th February 1887. He was the son of John Brine, a contractor/haulier, and Louisa Brine (née Prior). His siblings included Frank, born in 1889, who also died in the war. At the time of the 1911 Census he was single, working as a road contractor/carter and living at the family home on Sherborne Causeway, Enmore Green. Prior to this he had enlisted with the 44th Company, 3rd Depot of the Royal Garrison Artillery (Service No. 20661). He served for three years from 9th September 1907, then went into the reserves.

He was mobilized on 11th August 1914 and served with various Batteries within the Royal Garrison Artillery until he was transferred to the Royal Engineers on 28th May 1917 (New Service No. 252577). At the time of his death he held the rank of Corporal. He served in France & Flanders and towards, the end of the conflict, was posted to Italy. Whilst there he was awarded the Bronze Medal for Military Valour by the Italian Government, an announcement of which appeared in the London Gazette on 10th September 1918. He was also awarded the Victory, British War and 15 Star medals. He contracted influenza and died on 29th October 1918 at the 11th General Hospital, Genoa. He had been attached to the 15th Brigade of the Royal Garrison Artillery, Signal Sub-Section, R.E. He was buried at Staglieno Cemetery, Piazzale Resasco, Genoa, Italy (grave id. I.D.11). He is remembered on the war memorials at Motcombe and Enmore Green, Shaftesbury.

Images:
  • Enmore Green War Memorial 01
  • Enmore Green War Memorial 03
  • Names on Motcombe War Memorial 1
  • Motcombe War Memorial 4
  • Motcombe War Memorial 02
  • Motcombe War Memorial 3

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Motcombe War Memorial 1

Ernest John Inkpen

Surname: Inkpen
Other names: Ernest John
Other people in this story:
John Reece Bradford Inkpen
Martha Inkpen nee Newman
Walter Inkpen
Bertram Inkpen
Locations in this story:
Egypt
Kantara War Memorial Cemetery, Ismalia, Egypt
Behind Town, Shillingstone, Dorset
Shaftesbury
Motcombe, Dorset

Story:
Ernest John Inkpen was born on 3rd August, 1895 in Shillingstone, Dorset, and was baptised there on 27th October, 1895. He was the son of John Reece Bradford Inkpen, a Postman, and Martha Inkpen (nee Newman). His siblings included Walter, (b.1887), and Bertram, (b.1898), both of whom died in the war. At the time of the 1911 Census Ernest was single, working as an Office Clerk and living at Behind Town, Shillingstone, Dorset. He enlisted at Shaftesbury on 18th December, 1914, as a Private in the 5th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment (Service No. 12640). He later transferred, as a Sapper, to the Royal Engineers (Service No. 173268), on 20th April 1916 and joined the 276th Railway Company, Heavy Artillery, based in Ismalia, Egypt. He was awarded the Victory, British War and 15 Star medals. He died on 9th September 1916 from Enteric Fever and was buried at Ismalia War Memorial Cemetery, Ismalia, Egypt (grave id. A.7). He is remembered on the Motcombe War Memorial, Dorset, and also on the War Memorial at the Church of the Holy Rood, Shillingstone. Whilst his brother, Walter, also appears on the Motcombe memorial, there is no mention in the area of his brother, Bertram.

Images:
  • Names on Motcombe War Memorial 1
  • Motcombe War Memorial 4
  • Motcombe War Memorial 01
  • Motcombe War Memorial 02

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Ludwell War Memorial

Harry Gillingham

Surname: Gillingham
Other names: Harry
Other people in this story:
John Gillingham
Clara Gillingham nee Ingram
Daisy Millicent Gillingham née Rogers
Locations in this story:
France & Flanders
Arras Memorial, France
St. John the Baptish Church, Charlton, Wiltshire
Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire
Ludwell, Wiltshire

Story:
Harry Gillingham was born in 1889 in Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire. He was the son of John Gillingham, a Market Gardener, and Clara Gillingham (nee Ingram). At the time of the 1911 Census, he was working as a Wheelwright and living with his brother at Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire. On 23rd December, 1912, he married Daisy Millicent Rogers at St. John the Baptist Church, Charlton, Wilshire. There were two children of the marriage, two boys. He enlisted as a Sapper in the Royal Engineers (Service No. 160194). He served in France & Flanders and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He died whilst serving with the 2nd Special Company of the Royal Engineers on 23rd June 1917 and his name appears on the Arras Memorial (Bay 1). At the time of his death his wife was living at Hope Cottage, Donhead St. Mary. He is remembered on the war memorial at Ludwell.    

Images:
  • Names on Ludwell War Memorial 2

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Names on Park Walk War Memorial 2

William John Stainer

Surname: Stainer
Other names: William John
Other people in this story:
Thomas Stainer
Mary Ann Stainer nee Woolridge
Georgina Stainer née Trew
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury
France & Flanders
Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Popperinge, West Flanders, Belgium
Enmore Green
St. James' Church, Shaftesbury
West Knoyle, Wiltshire
Holy Trinity Church, Shaftesbury
St. Peter's Church, Shaftesbury
St. James, Shaftesbury
South Africa
Dorchester

Story:
William John Stainer was born in 1880 in Shaftesbury and baptised at Holy Trinity Church on 28th November, 1880. He was the son of Thomas Stainer, a baker, and Mary Ann Stainer (nee Woolridge). He enlisted in the Royal Engineers (Service No. 2371) in October 1898 and served both at home and in South Africa. He held both the Queen's South Africa medal and clasps 1900/1901 and the King's South African medal and clasps 1902/1903. Among many of the places he served in South Africa he was at the Relief of Ladysmith. He transferred to the Reserves on 15th August, 1902 and was finally fully discharged in 1910. In 1903 he married Georgina Trew from West Knoyle. They had six children: five boys and a girl. His father, Thomas, died in 1905 and his mother, Mary Ann, in early 1911. At the time of the 1911 Census, William was working as a farm implement fitter and living in Enmore Green, Shaftesbury. He re-enlisted in Dorchester as a Sapper in the Royal Engineers (Service No. O/2904). He had a brief spell with the Dorsetshire Regiment (Service No. 20113) but reverted back to the Royal Engineers (Final Service No. 508484). He served in France and Flanders and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He died of wounds on 2nd November 1917 whilst serving with the 502nd Field Company, Royal Engineers, and was buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery, Popperinge, West Flanders, Belgium (grave id. XI.B.17). He is remembered on the Park Walk and St. James’ War Memorials. He also appears on the Roll of Honour inside St. James’ Church and on the Holy Trinity memorial, now in St. Peter's Church, Shaftesbury. His wife remained a widow for the rest of her life living at 44 St. James, Shaftesbury per the 1939 Register.        

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Park Walk War Memorial 03
  • Names on St. James' War Memorial 3
  • St. James' Roll of Honour
  • St. James' War Memorial
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 3
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 2
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 1

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Names on Park Walk War Memorial 2

Reginald Stanley White

Surname: White
Other names: Reginald Stanley
Other people in this story:
James Augustus White
Mary Ann Bennett White nee Horton
Gertrude Dorothy White née Belton
Reginald C.B. White
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
India
Delhi Memorial (India Gate)
Byron Street, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire
St. Peter's Church, Shaftesbury
Holy Trinity Church, Shaftesbury
St. Mary's Church, Tedington

Story:
Reginald Stanley White was born in 1880 in Shaftesbury and baptised there on 11th April, 1880. He was the son of James Augustus White, a Tailor & Outfitter, and  Mary Ann Bennett White (nee Horton). "Stanley", as he was known, attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from January 1892 to April 1896. On leaving school he entered the Post Office. His mother died in 1904. On 6th February, 1907, he married Gertrude Dorothy Belton at St. Mary's Church, Teddington and in 1908 a son was born, Reginald C.B. White. At the time of the 1911 Census, he was a Post Office Worker and living at 49 Byron Street, Mansfield, Nottinghamshire.

He enlisted as a Sapper in the 17th Division, Signal Company, of the Royal Engineers (Service No. 182011). He served in India as a telegraphist and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. On 25th June 1919 he died of enteric fever on his way home from India and was buried at Tank Cemetery No. 54. His name appears on the Delhi Memorial (India Gate) (Face 1). He is remembered on the Park Walk War Memorial and on the Holy Trinity Memorial, now in St. Peter's Church, Shaftesbury.

As a former pupil his name appears as "S.White" on the Shaftesbury Grammar School memorial in Shaftesbury School. His name was also included on a hand written list of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving during the war. An asterix can be seen next to Stanley's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources:
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1919

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Park Walk War Memorial 02
  • Park Walk War Memorial 1
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 3
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 2
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 1
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 8

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Shastonian