Cann and Shaftesbury from Melbury Hill

Ernest Harry White

Surname: White
Other names: Ernest Harry
Other people in this story:
Charles White
Elizabeth Ann White née Hart
Sarah Elizabeth White née Knight
Locations in this story:
Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Ringwood, Hampshire
Lockwood Terrace, Shaftesbury

Story:
Ernest Harry White was born in Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 15th August 1898, the son of Charles White and Elizabeth Ann White (née Hart).  He lived most of his early life in Bozley Hill, Cann.   He enlisted and joined the Rifle Brigade as a Private (Service No. S/33321).  It is not known which Theatre of War he served in but on his discharge he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  He married Sarah Elizabeth Knight in Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 27th December 1924 and they went on to have one son.  By the time of the 1939 Register he was living at 9 Lockwood Terrace, Shaftesbury, Dorset, and working as a Petrol Lorry Driver.  His death was recorded in the Ringwood, Hampshire, Registry in 1986.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives

Frank Francis

Surname: Francis
Other names: Frank
Other people in this story:
Frederick Francis
Elizabeth Jane Francis née Moore
Ada Francis née Chorley
Locations in this story:
East Orchard, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Hailsham, Sussex
France
Sackville Gardens, East Grinstead, Sussex

Story:
Frank Francis was born at East Orchard, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 21st September 1888, the son of Frederick Francis and Elizabeth Jane Francis (née Moore).  He spent all of his early life in and around East Orchard.  He married Ada Chorley at East Orchard on 13th April 1914 and they went on to have two children.  Frank enlisted on 11th December 1915 but was not embodied until 29th May 1916 when he joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 5805).  He was transferred to the 25th (Reserve) Battalion of the Rifle Brigade (Service No. 2134) on 26th August 1916 and again to the Royal Surrey Regiment on 5th March 1917 and, finally, to the 443rd Agricultural (134th Labour Company) of the Labour Corps (Service No. 79957).  He had served in France and was demobilized on 22nd February 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  By the 1939 Register he and his family had moved to 24 Sackville Gardens, East Grinstead, Sussex, where he worked as a Corn Merchant's Labourer.  He died in the Hailsham, Sussex, Registry area in 1963.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
1913 Shaftesbury Grammar School Football Team

William Jeffery

Surname: Jeffery
Other names: William
Other people in this story:
James Jeffery
Elizabeth Jeffery née Lampon
Locations in this story:
Charlton, Andover, Hampshire
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Dardanelles, Turkey
Andover Cemetery, Hampshire
Chelsea, London

Story:
William Jeffery was born in 1897 in Charlton, Andover, Hampshire. He was the son of James Jeffery, a farmer and cattle dealer, and Elizabeth Lampon. “Willie” attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from November 1908 to December 1913 and he appears in the 1911 Census as a boarder at the school. He was a member of 1911, 1912 and 1913 football teams and a member of 1912 and 1913 cricket teams. In 1913 he was Head Prefect and passed the Cambridge Senior Locals Examination in July. On leaving school he returned to Hampshire to work on the family farm.

He joined the Army Service Corps soon after the outbreak of war (Service No. T4/1856030) and he appears on the Roll of Honour published in the Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine in October 1914. By March 1915 he had been promoted to the rank of Sergeant and the June edition of the magazine reported: “W.Jeffery visited the school on March 31st. Owing to an attack of mumps he was unable to sail with his regiment to the Dardanelles, and is now applying for a commission with the A.S.C.”

William received a commission and served in France as a Second Lieutenant in the 5th Rifle Brigade. The Grammar School Magazine reported: “William Jeffery was wounded in the eye and sent over to a hospital at Chelsea. For a time he made splendid progress, but had a relapse and died suddenly.” He died on 7th October 1917.  The death was recorded as a civilian death in the Chelsea Registry, but he was buried in the military section of Andover Cemetery. He is remembered on the Andover Cenotaph and on the Shaftesbury Grammar School Memorial, now in Shaftesbury School.

A "First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces" was produced by Shaftesbury Grammar School in September 1915. It shows the regiment in which William served and the date and term in which he left school. Throughout the war a hand-written list was also compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to William's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources: 

First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces, September 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, October 1914
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, March 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, June 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1917

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial
  • List of Old Shastonians 1
  • List of Old Shastonians 3
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 4

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Shastonian
1914 Shaftesbury Grammar School Athletics Team

Victor Charles Prince

Surname: Prince
Other names: Victor Charles
Other people in this story:
William John Prince
Agnes Jane Prince
Locations in this story:
Salisbury, Wiltshire
St. Ann Street, Salisbury
Choir School, Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Drewsteignton, Devon
Bouchavenes, Arras, France
Vis-En-Artois Cemetery Memorial, France
St. Martin’s Church, Salisbury

Story:
Victor Charles Prince was born in 1898 in Salisbury, Wiltshire. He was the son of William John Prince, a baker, and Agnes Jane Prince. The family lived at 66 St. Ann Street, Salisbury. In 1906 Victor was admitted to the Choir School at Salisbury Cathedral and at the time of the 1911 Census was a boarder there. He attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from September 1913 to December 1915. He was an outstanding sportsman and was a member of the school football team in 1913, 1914 and 1915 (Captain). He was also a member of the cricket team in 1914 and 1915. He represented the school in the Dorset Inter-School sports, winning the 100 Yards, 220 Yards and Quarter Mile in 1914 and 1915. He was a founder member of the school Cadet Corps and became Platoon Sergeant. He was an assistant librarian in the school library and passed the Cambridge Junior Locals in 1915. On leaving school he entered the Salisbury branch of the London City and Midland Bank.

In August 1916 Victor joined the Rifle Brigade and in December received his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 4th Battalion London Regiment. On 14th December 1917 he was posted to France. In August 1918 he returned on leave and visited the Shaftesbury Grammar School Cadet Camp at Drewsteignton. He returned to France and on 1st September 1918 was killed in action at Bouchavenes, south of Arras. According to the school magazine, “When killed, he was gallantly leading his men into action; he had already previously been wounded and had refused to go back, and he and his greatest friend were killed by the same shell.” In January 1919 it was announced in the London Gazette that he had been awarded the M.C. This was for the action in which he lost his life.

Victor’s name appears on the Vis-En-Artois Cemetery Memorial (Panel 10). He is also remembered on the memorial in St. Martin’s Church and on the Choir School Memorial in Salisbury.

As a former pupil his name was recorded on the Shaftesbury Grammar School war memorial, now in Shaftesbury School. Throughout the war a hand-written list was compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to Victor's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum. 

Printed Sources: 
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1918
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, March 1919

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 6
  • 1913 Shaftesbury Grammar School Football Team
  • 1914 Shaftesbury Grammar School Football Team

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Shastonian
Colin Mitchell 1

Colin Mitchell

Surname: Mitchell
Other names: Colin
Other people in this story:
John Thomas Mitchell
Emma Mitchell
Locations in this story:
Mere, Wiltshire
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Fletchin, France
Pozieres Memorial, France
France & Flanders

Story:
Colin Mitchell was born in Mere, Wiltshire in 1890. He was the son of John Thomas Mitchell, a farmer, and Emma Mitchell. He attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from February 1901 to April 1906 and appears on the 1901 Census as a boarder there. After leaving school he entered the Wilts and Dorset Bank. When the First World War broke out Colin joined the 8th Rifle Brigade as a Rifleman (Service No. B/567). He served in France & Flanders and was awarded the 1915 Star, Victory and British War medals. In 1916 he published Trampled Clay, a book of war poetry. The volume was published by Erskine MacDonald and included Hooge, which describes one of the first uses of flamethrowers in battle. Colin died at Fletchin in France on 22nd March 1918 and his name appears on the Pozieres Memorial, France (Panel 81 to 84). He is remembered on the Mere War Memorial and on the Shaftesbury Grammar School Memorial in Shaftesbury School.

A "First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces" was produced by Shaftesbury Grammar School in September 1915. It shows the regiment in which Colin served and the date and term in which he left school. His name was also included on a hand written list of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving during the war. An asterix can be seen next to Colin's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources:
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, October 1914
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, June 1918
First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces, September 1915
Trampled Clay, by Colin Mitchell, Erskine MacDonald, 1916
Mitchell Family History by Mervyn Mitchell

Images:
  • Colin Mitchell 2
  • Colin Mitchell 3
  • Trampled Clay
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 5
  • List of Old Shastonians 3
  • Mere War Memorial 3
  • Mere War Memorial 2
  • Mere War Memorial 1
  • Names on Mere War Memorial 1
  • Names on Mere War Memorial 3
  • Names on Mere War Memorial 2
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Shastonian
Tollard Royal War Memorial

Albert Thomas Kempshall

Surname: Kempshall
Other names: Albert Thomas
Other people in this story:
Albert Edward Kempshall
Alice Stemp Kempshall nee Tanner
Esther Kempshall nee Mobsby
Locations in this story:
Alexandria, Egypt
Cape Mataplan
Mikra Memorial, Kalamaria, Central Macedonia, Greece
West Grinstead, Horsham, Sussex
Tollard Royal, Wiltshire
Theydon Towers, Epping, Essex

Story:
Albert Kempshall was born in 1883 in West Grinstead, Sussex and baptised in Horsham, Sussex, on 10th June, 1883. He was the son of Albert Edward Kempshall, a Railway Porter, and Alice Stemp Kempshall (nee Tanner). His mother died in 1892 and his father re-married in 1898 to Esther Mobsby. At the time of the 1911 Census his family were living in Station Cottage, West Grinstead, Sussex, but Albert was working as a Domestic Gardener and boarding out with a family at The Gardens, Theydon Towers, Epping, Essex. He enlisted in Devizes, Wiltshire, giving Salisbury as his residence, as a Private and joined the 3rd/8th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (Service No. 5015) but transferred as a Rifleman to the of the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) with a new Service No. 2218. He later joined the 20th (Northern) Battalion, (Territorial) of the Rifle Brigade with yet another new Service No. 207135. He died at sea on 1st January 1917 when RMS Ivernia was torpedoed 58 miles South East of Cape Matapan on the way to Alexandria, Egypt. He was one of 85 men who drowned out of a total of 2400 troops on board. His name appears on the Mikra Memorial, Kalamaria, Central Macedonia, Greece. He was awarded the British War medal and is remembered on the Tollard Royal War Memorial.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Niel Shaw Stewart memorial 4

Niel Shaw Stewart

Surname: Shaw Stewart
Other names: Niel
Other people in this story:
Walter Richard Shaw-Stewart
Mary Beatrice Sydney Shaw-Stewart nee Leverson-Lane
Locations in this story:
Belgravia, London
Guillemont, France
Delville Wood Cemetery, Longueval, Somme, France
Hays House, Wiltshire
Eton College, Berkshire
St. Catherine's Church, Sedgehill, Wiltshire
Fonthill Abbey, Tisbury, Wiltshire
France & Flanders
University College, Oxford
St. Pancras Church, Marylebone, London

Story:
Niel Shaw-Stewart was born on 7th July, 1894 in Belgravia, London, and baptised at St. Pancras Church, Marylebone, London, on 10th July, 1894. He was the son of Walter Richard Shaw-Stewart and Mary Beatrice Sydney Shaw-Stewart (nee Leverson-Lane). At the time of the 1911 Census the family were living at Hays House, Sedgehill, Wiltshire, and Niel was single and a scholar at Eton College from where he went on to University College, Oxford, and obtained a B.A. degree in 1916. He enlisted in the 3rd Battalion of the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) served in France & Flanders, including Ypres and the Somme. he was wounded on 3rd May, 1915, but was able to return in due course to active duty. He died on 21st August 1916 in Guillemont in France. At the time of his death he held the rank of Lieutenant. He was awarded the Victory, British War and 1915 Star medals. He was buried at Delville Wood Cemetery, Longueval, Somme, France (grave id. XIII.N.10). He is remembered on the memorial plaque in St. Catherine's Church, Sedgehill. In 1922 his parents were living at Fonthill Abbey, Tisbury, Wiltshire. They commissioned a separate memorial to their son which is in the form of a stone cross on the A350 which was restored by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission for the centenary commemorations in 2014. His name also appears on the De Ruvigny's Roll of Honour.

Images:
  • Niel Shaw Stewart memorial 3
  • Niel Shaw Stewart memorial 2
  • Niel Shaw Stewart memorial 1
  • Niel Shaw Stewart memorial plaque
  • Sedgehill War Memorial 1
  • Sedgehill War Memorial 2

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Names on Ludwell War Memorial 2

Sidney Frank Fletcher

Surname: Fletcher
Other names: Sidney Frank
Other people in this story:
William Fletcher
Charlotte Ann Fletcher nee Watts
William Henry Fletcher
Locations in this story:
France & Flanders
Thiepval Memorial, France
Old Boundary Road, Shaftesbury
Higher Coombe, Shaftesbury
Little Ridge Stable, Ridge, Chilmark, Wiltshire
Ludwell, Wiltshire
Cann Parish Church, Shaftesbury
Shaftesbury

Story:
Sidney Frank Fletcher was born on 21st December, 1892, in Higher Coombe, Shaftesbury, and baptised at Cann Parish Church, Shaftesbury, on 22nd January, 1893. He was the son of William Fletcher, a Gardener, and Charlotte Ann Fletcher (nee Watts) and brother of William Henry (b.1894), who served in the Machine Gun Corps during the Great War. At the time of the 1911 Census he was single, working as a domestic groom and living Little Ridge Stable, Ridge, Chilmark, Wiltshire. He enlisted in Shaftesbury as a Rifleman and joined the 1st Battalion of the Rifle Brigade (The Price Consort's Own) (Service No. 6031). He served in France & Flanders and was awarded the Victory, British War and 1915 Star medals. He died on 1st July 1916 and his name appears on the Thiepval Memorial (Pier and Face 16B and 16C). By the end of the war Frank's parents had moved to Glenlyne, 17 Old Boundary Road, Shaftesbury, Dorset. He is remembered on the war memorial at Ludwell.

Images:
  • Ludwell War Memorial

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
William Henry Fletcher
St. John the Baptist Church, Berwick St. John 01

George Follett

Surname: Follett
Other names: George
Other people in this story:
William Follett
Elizabeth Follett nee Franklin
Locations in this story:
Basingstoke, Hampshire
France & Flanders
Ramleh War Cemetery, Near Tel Aviv, Palestine
Easton Farm, Berwick St. John, Wiltshire
Winchester Training College, Winchester, Hampshire
Palestine

Story:
George Follett was born on 4th July, 1891, in Basingstoke, Hampshire. He was the son of William Follett, a Farmer, and Elizabeth Follett (nee Franklin). At the time of 1911 Census the family were living at Easton Farm, Berwick St. John, Wiltshire. George was single and was a student at Winchester Training College (a Teacher Training facility). He enlisted in the 23rd Battalion of The Royal Fusiliers (The Sportsman's Regiment) (Service Nos. 1493 then GS/47962). Whist with the Fusiliers he achieved the rank of Lance Sergeant. He transferred to the 6th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) where he was commissioned with the rank of 2nd Lieutenant. He served in France & Flanders, where he was wounded at Delville Wood, France. After his recovery in the UK he was posted to Palestine. He was awarded the Victory, British War and 1915 Star medals. He died whilst attached to the 1st/10th London Regiment on 19th September 1918 and was re-interred from a battlefield cemetery at Ramleh War Cemetery, Near Tel Aviv in Palestine (grave id. E.12). He is remembered on the Berwick St. John War Memorial and on the Winchester Training College Chapel Rail.

Images:
  • Berwick St John War Memorial

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Berwick St. John War Memorial

Alfred Edwin Messer

Surname: Messer
Other names: Alfred Edwin
Other people in this story:
Robert Messer
Jemima Jane Messer nee Ferrett
Locations in this story:
St. John the Baptist Church, Berwick St. John, Wiltshire
France & Flanders
Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France
Arundell Cottages, Rushmore, Berwick St. John, Wiltshire
Tollard Royal, Wiltshire
Church of St. Peter and Vincula, Tollard Royal, Wiltshire
Berwick St. John, Wiltshire
Nottingham

Story:
Alfred Edwin Messer was born in 1893 in Berwick St. John, Wiltshire. He was the son of Robert Messer, a Road Man, and Jemima Jane Messer (nee Ferrett). At the time of the 1911 Census he was single, working as a Gardener and living at 12 Arundell Cottages, Rushmore, Berwick St. John, Wiltshire. He enlisted in Nottingham as a Rifleman in the 10th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort's Own) (Service No. S/3260). He served in France & Flanders and was awarded the Victory, British War and 1915 Star medals. He died on 21st November 1917 and his name appears on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, France (Panel 10 and 11). He is remembered on the memorial plaque inside the church at Berwick St. John.

He is also remembered in Tollard Royal on the War Memorial and on the Roll of Honour inside the Church of St. Peter and Vincula in the village.

Images:
  • St. John the Baptist Church, Berwick St. John 01
  • Berwick St John War Memorial
  • Tollard Royal War Memorial

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives