Shaftesbury Grammar School 4

Roy Charlton

Surname: Charlton
Other names: Roy
Other people in this story:
Henry Charlton
Abigail Charlton née Howell
Ethel Mary Charlton née Wintle
Locations in this story:
Donhead St. Andrew, Wiltshire
Shaftesbury, Dorset
Southsea, Portsmouth, Hampshire
Dursley, Gloucestershire
Swanage, Dorset

Story:
Roy Charlton was born in Donhead St. Andrew, Wiltshire, on 8th April 1891 and baptised there on 10th May 1891, the son of Henry Charlton, a local schoolmaster, and Abigail Charlton (née Howell).  He lived his early life in Donhead St. Andrew and received some of his education at Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset, leaving in 1907.  By the 1911 Census he was boarding at 44 Hudson Road, Southsea, Portsmouth, Hampshire, where he was working as a Bank Clerk with the National Provincial Bank.   He enlisted with the 1/6th Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment as a Private (Service Nos. 1972 & 280624).  On the 18th April 1915 he was promoted to Lieutenant and joined the Dorsetshire Regiment.  It is not known in which theatre of war he served but following his discharge he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  Whilst still serving in the forces he married Ethel Mary Wintle at Dursley, Gloucestershire, on 11th July 1917.  The 1921 Census shows him living in Pine Close, Charminster Road, Bournemouth, Hampshire, still with the National Provincial Bank as a Checking Clerk. By the time of the 1939 Register he had moved to 'Barford', Salisbury Road, Swanage, Dorset, where he was now a Bank Manager and also as a Volunteer Special Constable.  He died on 7 Jan 1967 in Poole, Dorset.

A "First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces" was produced by Shaftesbury Grammar School in September 1915. It shows the regiment in which Roy served and the date and term in which he left school. Throughout the war a hand-written list was also compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources:
First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, March 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, June 1916
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1916
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, March 1918

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys C
  • List of Old Shastonians 1
  • List of Old Shastonians 3

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Shastonian
Layton Lane 1

Arthur Thomas White

Surname: White
Other names: Arthur Thomas
Other people in this story:
William White
Lydia White née Hillier
Margaret White
John White
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury, Dorset
Berwick St. John, Dorset
France & Flanders
Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset
St. James, Shaftesbury
Layton Lane, Shaftesbury
Salisbury Street, Shaftesbury
Cann, Shaftesbury

Story:
Arthur Thomas White was born in Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 9th March 1880 and baptised at St. James Church on 4th April 1880, the son of William White and Lydia White (née Hillier). He lived all of his life, apart from Military Service, in Shaftesbury. He had, prior to the First World War, served with the Territorial Unit of the 4th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment and had been placed with the 1st Reserves.   He re-enlisted on 27th August 1914 and joined the 3rd Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 7654). He was sent to France and Flanders and whilst serving there in August 1915 suffered from Trench Fever. He also suffered from being gassed and receiving a gunshot wound to the hand.  Whilst on recovery leave he married Margaret White (same surname) in Berwick St. John, Dorset, on 20th November 1915. On 9th September 1916 he was transferred to the 3rd Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment (Service No. 29736) and was finally discharged on 8th February 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1914/15 Star.  In addition he was awarded a small pension in regard to the earlier gassing.  On discharge he went to live at 3 Layton Lane, Shaftesbury.   By the time of the 1939 Register he was living at 57 Salisbury Street, Shaftesbury, working as a Gardener.   He died in 1949 and was buried at St. Rumbold's Church, Cann, Shaftesbury, on 4th June 1949.

Arthur's brother John (b.1890) also served in the war, with the Royal Engineers.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
John White
The National Archives

William Frederick George Head

Surname: Head
Other names: William Frederick George
Other people in this story:
William Head
Thirza Jane Head née Biddiscombe
Reginald Charles John Head
Reginald Andrews
Mable Kate Head née Lampard
Locations in this story:
Donhead St. Andrew, Wiltshire
Poonah, India
Shaftesbury, Dorset
Mere, Wiltshire
Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire
Station Bridge Cottages, Tisbury, Wiltshire
Sedgehill, Wiltshire

Story:
William Frederick George Head was born in Donhead St. Andrew, Wiltshire, on 21st November 1888, the son of William Head and Thirza Jane Head (née Biddiscombe).  He spent his early life in and around Donhead St. Andrew and sometime before 1911 he enlisted with the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 8210).  His father had died in 1905 and his mother had married Reginald Andrews on 5th June 1907.  The 1911 Census shows him at the Barracks in Poonah, India. He apparently served in the India/Asiatic region throughout the First World War and was eventually discharged on 5th May 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1914/1915 Star.  On discharge on 5 May 1919 he had given an address at Birdbush, Ludwell, Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire, as his residence. The 1921 Census shows him living in at Hay House, Sedgehill, Wiltshire, employed as a Butler.  He married Mable Kate Lampard in Mere, Wiltshire, in 1928.  By the time of the 1939 Register he was living at Station Bridge Cottages, Tisbury, Wiltshire, described as a Gardener/Handyman as well as being a member of the National Defence Corps (which eventually became the Home Guard).   He died at the Westminster Memorial Hospital, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 8 Jan 1943.  His brother, Reginald Charles Head, had also served but died in 1917 of pneumonia whilst in service.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
Reginald Charles John Head
The National Archives
Great War 150

Ernest Edward Gatehouse

Surname: Gatehouse
Other names: Ernest Edward
Other people in this story:
James Howe Gatehouse
Mary Gatehouse née Farmer
Laura Mary Gatehouse née Brown
Thomas William Gatehouse
Victor Stokes
Sidney Herbert Gatehouse
Walter John Gatehouse
Percy George Gatehouse
Charles Howe Gatehouse
Locations in this story:
Ivy Cross, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Milton on Stour, Gillingham, Dorset
Mere, Wiltshire
France & Flanders
La Bassee, France

Story:
Ernest Edward Gatehouse was born in Shaftesbury, Dorset, in 1883 the son of James Howe Gatehouse and Mary Gatehouse (née Farmer).   The family lived at Ivy Cross, Shaftesbury, until, by 1901 they had moved to Milton on Stour, Gillingham, Dorset.  Ernest married Laura Mary Brown at the St. Michael the Archangel Church, Mere, Wiltshire, on 13th November 1912 and they went on to have six children. He was described as a Railway Delivery Agent on the 1911 Census. Ernest enlisted with the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 6151).  He served in France and Flanders with the 8th Battalion and was taken prisoner at La Bassee, France, on 23rd January 1915 and sent to Prisoner of War camp at Mersebury, near Liepzig in Germany. This was Camp Altengrabow. While there he had a trinket box and a cup made for his wife Laura Mary and engraved with her initials. Following his release he was not discharged until 31st March 1920. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1914 Star.  He died on 6 Apr 1935 in Mere, Wiltshire, and was buried in Mere on 10 Apr 1935.  His brothers, Percy George, Charles Howe, Sidney Herbert, Ernest Edward and Thomas William, all served and survived the conflict whilst their nephew, Victor Stokes, died.  His remaining brother, Walter John, was also purported to have served but no reliable military record can be found. His death was recorded in Edenbridge, Mere, Wiltshire, on 6th April 1935 and he was buried at Mere on 10th April 1935.  One of his brothers, Thomas William Gatehouse, also served in the conflict and his nephew, Victor Stokes, was killed during the war in an accident.

Images:
  • Great War 150
  • Ivy Cross, Shaftesbury
  • Trinket box made at Camp Altengrabow
  • Cup made at Camp Altengrabow 2
  • Cup made at Camp Altengrabow 1

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Melbury Abbas and Zig Zag Hill

Ernest Edward Lucas

Surname: Lucas
Other names: Ernest Edward
Other people in this story:
Alfred Charles Lucas
Annie Mary Lucas née Henstridge
Mildre Rose Lucas née Barnes
Gladys Maud Lucas née Sims
Locations in this story:
White Pit Lane, Melbury Abbas, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Balkans
Melksham, Wiltshire
Wincanton, Somerset
Galhampton, North Cadbury, Somerset

Story:
Ernest Edward Lucas was born in Melbury Abbas, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 17th September 1898 and baptised there on 20th Nov 1898. He was the son of Alfred Charles Lucas and Annie Mary Lucas (née Henstridge). He lived all his early life in and around Melbury Abbas. He enlisted with the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 14487) and served with the 5th Battalion in the Balkans from 16 Oct 1915.  He later transferred to the Essex Regiment (Service No. 59134).  On his discharge on 8th August 1919 he was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1915 Star.  He married Mildred Rose Barnes in Melksham, Wiltshire, in 1920.  The Census of 1921 shows him living at High Road, Galhampton, Noth Cadbury, Somerst, working as a Farm Labourer. By the 1939 Register he had moved to 4 Penn View, Wincanton, Somerset, and was working as a Builders General Labourer.   His wife, Mildred, died in 1962 and he remarried, to Gladys Maud Sims in Wincanton, Somerset, in 1963.   Ernest died in Wincanton in 1970.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives

Frederick John Coffin

Surname: Coffin
Other names: Frederick John
Other people in this story:
Elizabeth Coffin
Robert Domoney
Hilda May Coffin née Grinter
Locations in this story:
The Chalk, Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Egypt
France & Flanders
Nesle, Peronne, Somme, France
Germany
Bradpole, Dorset
Chideock, Dorset

Story:
Frederick John Coffin was born in Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 17th May 1893 and baptised there on 6th August 1893, the son of Elizabeth Coffin (no father was mentioned in the records).  Elizabeth went on to marry Robert Domoney; thus Frederick gained a step-father.  The family lived at The Chalk, Iwerne Minster, throughout his early life.  Frederick enlisted on 14th June 1915 and joined the 3/4th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service Nos. 3893 & 15052).  He served in Egypt with the 7th Battalion until 15th January 1917 when he transferred to the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry (Service No. 241328) and was posted to France and Flanders.  On 25th December 1917 he was again transferred to the 10th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry (Service No. 351539). He took part in a battle in the Somme area which commenced on 21st March 1918 and was reported wounded and missing on 26th March 1918 at Nesle, Peronne, Somme, France, only to later be reported as being a Prisoner of War.  He served his imprisonment in Germany and was eventually repatriated on 8th December 1918.  He was finally discharged on 22nd March 1919 and awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1915 Star.  He married Hilda May Grinter at Chideock, Dorset, on 5th April 1920 and by the 1921 Census had set up home 'near' The School, Chideock, living with his wife's parents whilst Frederick was noted as an 'Out of Work Agricultural Labourer'.  By the time of the 1939 Register he was living at Olinku Cottage, Chideock, Dorset, and was employed as a Roadman for Dorset County Council.  His death was recorded at Bradpole, Dorset, on 20th December 1967 having latterly moved there to live at 1 Court Close, Bradpole. Printed source: "Iwerne Minster Before, During, and After the Great War", edited by P. Anderson Graham, printed for Private Circulation only.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives

Maurice Frederick Clark

Surname: Clark
Other names: Maurice Frederick
Other people in this story:
James Clark
Sarah Anne Clark née Burt
Elsie Mabel Clark née Pike
Reginald Eli James Clark
Locations in this story:
Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Fremlicourt, Cambrai, Somme, France
France & Flanders
Balkans
Dorchester, Dorset.
Germany

Story:
Maurice Frederick Clark was born in Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 26th May 1893 and baptised there on 6th August 1893, the son of James Clark and Sarah Anne Clark (née Burt).  He lived all his life in the Iwerne Minster area.  He enlisted and joined the 5th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (later Corporal) (Service No. 10143).  He served with them in the Balkans.  He later went to France and Flanders and whilst there transferred to the 1st Battalion of the Duke of Edinburgh's (Wiltshire) Regiment (Service No. 28887)  He took part in the Battle of the Somme which commenced on 21st March 1918 but was taken prisoner on 24th March, 1918 at Fremlicourt, Cambrai, Somme, France, and spent time in a POW Camp in Germany.  Following his repatriation he was discharged on 6th April 1919 and awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1915 Star.  By the 1921 Census he was living in Tower Hill, Iwerne Minster, working as a Bricklayer for the Ismay Estates.  He married Elsie Mabel Pike at Iwerne Minster, Dorset, on 26th September 1925.    (No record of the whereabouts of his wife has been found after this time though she is thought to have died in 1994).   By the time of the 1939 Register he was living at The Hollow, Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset, and still working as a Bricklayer.   He died at Damers Hospital, Dorchester, Dorset, on 17th August 1961 and probate was eventually granted to another person other than his wife. Maurice's brother Reginald Eli James also served in the war with the Dorsetshire Regiment and was sadly killed at Gallipoli in 1915. Printed source: "Iwerne Minster Before, During, and After the Great War", edited by P. Anderson Graham, printed for Private Circulation only.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
Reginald Eli James Clark
The National Archives

Charles Francis Burden

Surname: Burden
Other names: Charles Francis
Other people in this story:
Francis William Burden
Annie Eliza Burden née Webb
Dorothy Caroline Burden née Llewellin
Locations in this story:
Tarrant Gunville, Dorset
Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Salisbury, Wiltshire
Little Bedwyn, Marlborough, Wiltshire

Story:
Charles Francis Burden was born at Tarrant Gunville, Dorset, on 9th October 1895 the son of Francis William Burden and Annie Eliza Burden (née Weeks).  He lived his early life at Tarrant Gunville, Dorset.  By 1914 he had moved to The Drove, Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset.  He enlisted and served with the 2nd Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 16353).  It is not known in which theatre of war he served in but after his discharge on 25th March 1919 he was awarded the Victory and British War medals.   By the 1921 Census he was living with his parents in The Drove, Iwerne Minster, working as a Farm labourer for the Ismay Estates.  He married Dorothy Caroline Llewellin at Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 14th October 1923.   By the time of the 1939 Register he had moved to 7 Brigmerston, Nr. Salisbury, Dorset, and was working as a domestic gardener.  His death was recorded at Little Bedwyn, Marlborough, Wiltshire, on 10th December 1979 having previously moved to live there at The Annex, White House Cottage, Little Bedwyn.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives

Walter Pool Bartlett

Surname: Bartlett
Other names: Walter Pool
Other people in this story:
Herbert Bartlett
Jane Bartlett née Pool
Matilda Emma Bartlett née Windsor
Locations in this story:
Yeovil, Somerset
Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Balkans
Andover, Hampshire
Tarrant Gunville, Dorset

Story:
Walter Pool Bartlett was born in Yeovil, Somerset, on 17th August 1893 and baptised there on 8th November 1893, the son of Herbert Bartlett and Jane Bartlett (née Pool).  By 1901 he had moved to Tarrant Gunville, Dorset, and by 1911 to Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset.  He enlisted and served with the 5th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 10009).  He served with his unit in the Balkan Theatre of War and on his discharge on 14th February 1919 was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1915 Star.  He married Matilda Emma Windsor in Iwerne Minster, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 29th March 1921 and the 1921 Census shows them living at Bowers Barn, Iwerne Minster, where Walter was working as a Stockman on the Ismay Estate.   By the time of the 1939 Register he had moved to New Cottages, Red Rice, Andover, Hampshire, and was working as a Cowman.  His death was recorded in Andover in 1954.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives

Bertram Robert Stone

Surname: Stone
Other names: Bertram Robert
Other people in this story:
John Stone
Eliza Elizabeth Stone née Gale
Elizabeth Ann Stone née Cake
Charles Henry Stone
Thomas John Stone
Locations in this story:
Shipton Gorge, Dorset
Parsonage Street, Fontmell Magna, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Tolpuddle, Dorchester, Dorset
Bournemouth, Hampshire
Mesopotamia
India
Sturminster, Dorset

Story:
Bertram Robert Stone was born at Shipton Gorge, Dorset, on 4th October 1898, the son of John Stone and Eliza Elizabeth Stone (née Gale).  By 1901 the family had moved to Parsonage Street, Fontmell Magna, Shaftesbury, Dorset, where Bertram spent his early life.  He enlisted on 13th November 1915 and was mobilized on 20th January 1916, joining the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 16354).  He served in Mesopotamia and then India, rising to the rank of Lance Corporal.  He was returned to the UK on compassionate grounds on 20th November 1917 due to the death of his two brothers, Charles Henry Stone and Thomas John Stone.  He was transferred to the  449th Agricultural Company of the Labour Corps (Service No. 546444) on 31st March 1918 and eventually discharged on 8th March 1919.  He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  By the 1921 Census he was living with his parents in Fontmell Magna working as a Cheese Maker at the Farmers Industry Dairy Ltd in Sturminster. He married Elizabeth Ann Cake at Tolpuddle, Dorchester, Dorset, on 21st December 1924.   By the time of the 1939 Register he was living at 108 Strouden Road, Bournemouth, Hampshire, and was working as a Hire Motor Car Driver as well as being a volunteer with the ARP  - (note his wife was living in Dorchester with her mother).  His death was recorded in Bournemouth, Hampshire, in 1988.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Thomas John Stone
Charles Henry Stone