Henry Stephen Lampard

Surname: Lampard
Other names: Henry Stephen
Other people in this story:
Cicely Lampard
Ella Elsie Lampard née Mullins
Locations in this story:
Sands Lane, Donhead St. Andrew, Wiltshire
France & Flanders
Egypt

Story:
Henry Stephen Lampard was born on 12th February 1888 at Donhead St. Andrew, Wiltshire, the son of Cicely Lampard.  (The name of the father is not known).  He lived his entire life, except for the period of military service, at Sands Lane, Donhead St. Andrew.   He married Ella Elsie Mullins at Donhead St. Andrew on 25th March 1913 and they went on to have three children.  Henry enlisted on 5th June 1916 and was mobilized on 16th July 1916 when he joined the 1st Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry as a Private (Service Nos. 5343 & 301369) with whom he served in France & Flanders.  He later transferred to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (Service No. 55332) and served with them in Egypt guarding a Prisoner of War Camp.  Whilst there he suffered from the Influenza pandemic of the time.  He at sometime held the rank of Lance Corporal but this is not reflected on his medal records.  He was discharged on 20th January 1920 and was awarded the Victory and British War medals.   By the 1939 Register he was living at Shirley Cottage, Sands Lane, Donhead St. Andrew, Wiltshire, and was working as a Roadman for the Wiltshire County Council.  He died on 26th February, 1963 at Donhead St. Andrew.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives

William Thomas Brown

Surname: Brown
Other names: William Thomas
Other people in this story:
Samuel Brown
Clara Brown née Moore
Cyril Brown
Constance Kate Brown née Gray
Obery Archibald Brown
Bertram George Brown
Harry Brown
Locations in this story:
Higher Blandford Road, Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset
India
France
Railway Terrace, Gillingham, Dorset
Wavering Terrace, Gillingham, Dorset

Story:
William Thomas Brown was born in Cann, Shaftesbury, on 7th March 1888 the son of Samuel Brown and Clara Brown (née Moore). William lived with his family in Higher Blandford Road, Cann, Shaftesbury, until enlisting in the 11th Hussars on 19th March 1906 (Service No. 5872). He was transferred shortly after to the 13th Hussars (Service No. 1177). He qualified as a Private (Shoeing Smith) and served in India. In March 1913 he was placed on Reserve during which time he became a Postman in the Shaftesbury area and married Constance Kate Gray in Gillingham, Dorset, on 10th December 1913. They went on to have four children. At the outbreak of war he was embodied on 5th August 1914 and re-joined his Regiment. On 17th June 1915 he was transferred to the 3rd Battalion of the Yorkshire & Lancashire Regiment (Service No. 3/20836) and posted to France. On the 16th September 1916 he was again transferred to the Northumberland Fusiliers (Service No. 1073) and again to the Durham Light Infantry on 12th December 1916 (Service No. 25835). He spent his final few months of service from 30th June 1917 until his discharge (due to being unfit for further duty) on 19th November 1917 in the 378th Home Service Company of the Labour Corps (Service No. 165859). He was awarded the Victory and British War medals along with the 1914/15 Star. On discharge he went to live at Railway Terrace, Gillingham, Dorset. By the 1939 Register William and family were living at 10 Wavering Terrace, Gillingham, Dorset. He died in Gillingham in 1961 and was buried there on 1st July 1961.

Two of William's brothers died in the war: Bertram George (b.1895) died on 4th April 1915 while a prisoner of war in Germany; Obery Archibald (b.1891) was killed in France on 19th March 1917 while serving with the East Kent Regiment. Two more brothers served in the war: Cyril (b.1894) in the Royal Navy and Harry (b.1885) with the Royal Army Service Corps.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Cyril Brown
Harry Brown
Obery Archibald Brown
Bertram George Brown
Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial

Gerald Bardsley Taylor

Surname: Taylor
Other names: Gerald "Jerry" Bardsley
Other people in this story:
John William Taylor
Ann Mary Taylor née Bardsley
John "Jack" William Taylor
Pryce Taylor
Arnold Bradley Taylor
Locations in this story:
Loughborough, Leicestershire
Bell Foundry House, Freehold Street, Loughborough
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Nottingham University
Canada
France
Trefcon British Cemetery, Caulaincourt, Aisne, France

Story:
Gerald “Jerry” Bardsley Taylor was born in 1886 in Loughborough, Leicestershire. He was the son of John William Taylor, a Bellfounder, and Ann Mary Bardsley. His siblings included John "Jack" William (born 1885), Pryce Taylor (born 1891) and Arnold Bradley (born 1894). The family lived at Bell Foundry House, Freehold Street, Loughborough. “Jerry” attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from September 1893 to July 1902. He was captain of the cricket and football teams, and was “Champion Athlete” in 1901 and 1902. After leaving the school he entered Nottingham University and then, in 1905 went to Canada, where he remained until the outbreak of the war.

The Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine reported: “Jerry Taylor enlisted in a Canadian Infantry Battalion (31st Alberta) soon after the war broke out, and went to the front in September, 1915. He soon rose to be a sergeant, and after the Somme offensive in July, 1916, he came home and took a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment.” In 1918 he was allowed to return to Canada to visit his farm for three months. The first fortnight of September was spent in England before he returned to France.

The report continues: “On Sept. 23rd, a neighbouring battalion of the Durham L.I. applied to his regiment for three officers to go “over the top” with them next day. “Jerry” was one of the three selected, and had scarcely crossed the parapet when he was instantaneously killed by machine gun fire. He was a fine all-round sportsman, and after leaving School played regularly for the Loughborough Corinthians F.C. A magnificent figure of a man, full of life and energy, and yet so gentle and affectionate that he was beloved by all. He is the third of his brothers to die in this war, Arnold having been killed in July, 1916, and John in September, 1916, and we offer our very deepest sympathy to his father and family in their terrible losses.”

He died on 24th September 1918 and was buried at the Trefcon British Cemetery, Caulaincourt, Aisne. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

As a former pupil his name was recorded on the Shaftesbury Grammar School war memorial, now in Shaftesbury School.  A "First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces" was produced by Shaftesbury Grammar School in September 1915. It shows the regiment in which Gerald served and the date and term in which he left school. Throughout the war a hand-written list was also compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to Gerald's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources: 

Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, June 1918
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1918
First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces, September 1915

Images:
  • List of Old Shastonians 1
  • List of Old Shastonians 4
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 7

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