St. James' Church

Harold George Stainer

Surname: Stainer
Other names: Harold George
Other people in this story:
George Theodore Stainer
Jane Stainer née Young
Kate Mary Stainer née King
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury, Dorset
St. James, Shaftesbury

Story:
Harold George Stainer was born on the 30th September 1888 in Shaftesbury, Dorset and baptised at St. James' Church on 28th October 1888 the son of the George Theodore Stainer and Jane Stainer (née Young).  He lived his whole life, apart from during Military Service, in St. James, Shaftesbury.    He married Kate Mary King at St. James Church, Shaftesbury, on 10th October 1914.  There are no records of any children.   He enlisted on the 7th June 1916 but was not mobilized until 12th March 1917 when he joined the Devonshire Regiment (Labour Company) as a Private (Service No. 59879).  Shortly after he was transferred to the Labour Corps 3rd Reserve Battalion and was posted to the 303rd Labour Company (Service No. 290276).   On the 13th October 1917 he was transferred to the 191 Training Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps (which became the Royal Air Force on 1st April 1918) (Service No. 104964).  He held the rank of Air Mechanic II and was employed as an Aero Rigger.   He was discharged, having served the whole time in the UK, on 12th April 1919 as being unfit for further service and received the Silver War Badge.  There are no other medal records.   By the 1939 Register he was living at 18 Layton Lane, Shaftesbury, and working as a Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer.   He died in Shaftesbury on 1st April 1955 and was buried in St. James Churchyard on 6th April 1955.

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The National Archives
Donhead St. Mary Church

Frederick Harry Bennett

Surname: Bennett
Other names: Frederick Harry
Other people in this story:
Thomas Bennett
Ann Bennett née Witt
Bertie Harold Bennett
Walter Sam Bennett
Thomas William Bennett
Reginald George Bennett
Agnes Marjorie Bennett née Ingram
Locations in this story:
Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire
Ashcombe, Berwick St. John, Wiltshire
Andover, Hampshire
France & Flanders
Possingworth Park, Sussex
Eastbourne, Sussex
Vicarage Road, Wallingford, Berkshire
Possingworth Park, Sussex

Story:
Frederick Harry Bennett was born in Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire, in 1889, the son of Thomas Bennett and Ann (Annie) Bennett (née Witt).  He lived his early life with his family at Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire, and Ashcombe, Berwick St. John, Wiltshire.   He married Agnes Marjorie Ingram in the Andover Registration District, Hampshire, in 1910.  He enlisted with the Somerset Light Infantry as a Private (Service No. 36457).  He was transferred to the Devonshire Regiment (Service No. 76119) and served in France and Flanders where it is understood he was a sniper.  After his discharge he was awarded the British War Medal.  (There are no surviving military records in this case.)  By the time of the 1939 Register he was living at 1 Vicarage Road, Wallingford, Berkshire.  He took up a position of Gamekeeper at Possingworth Park, Sussex, where he was highly thought of.  His death in 1968 was registered in the Eastbourne, Sussex, Registration District.  The tragedy is that he was one of five brothers of whom four, Bertie Harold, Walter Sam, Thomas William and Reginald George, were all killed in the conflict.

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Walter Sam Bennett
Bertie Harry Bennett
Reginald George Bennett
Thomas William Bennett

William Henry Fletcher

Surname: Fletcher
Other names: William Henry
Other people in this story:
William Fletcher
Charlotte Ann Fletcher née Watts
Sidney Frank Fletcher
Locations in this story:
Higher Coombe, Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire
France
Egypt
Salonika, Greece
Willinghdon Road, Wood Green, Middlesex
Haringey, Greater London
Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset

Story:
William Henry Fletcher was born at Higher Coombe, Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire, on 30th October 1894 and baptised at Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 6th January 1895. He was the son of William Fletcher and Charlotte Ann Fletcher (née Watts) and brother of Sidney Frank (b.1892) who was killed during the Great War. During his childhood William lived with his family at Higher Coombe.

He enlisted on 10th September 1914 with the Somerset Light Infantry (Service No. 14253) but was immediately placed on reserve. He rejoined on 22nd September 1914 and was transferred to the 10th (Service) Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment on 30th September 1914 (Service No. 13507). He embarked for France on 22nd September 1915 and on 31st October 1915 re-embarked for Egypt. He then served in Salonika during which time he transferred to the Machine Gun Corps on 14th August 1917 (Service No. 74545) and was attached to the 79th Company (Tank Corps). He suffered during his time in the Near East with malaria and had various spells in hospital. Nevertheless on the 22nd December 1918 he was promoted to Sergeant. He embarked for England on 11th April 1919 and was eventually demobilized on 25th May 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1914/15 Star.

By the 1939 Register he is shown living at 157 Willingdon Road, Wood Green, Middlesex, working as a hotel valet. He remained single and died in the Haringey, Greater London, Registry District in 1981.

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Sidney Frank Fletcher
St. James, Shaftesbury 4

Robert John Hayter

Surname: Hayter
Other names: Robert John
Other people in this story:
William Hayter
Elizabeth Hayter née Padfield
Florence Elizabeth Hayter née Gamlin
Locations in this story:
St. James, Shaftesbury, Dorset
France
Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset

Story:
Robert John Hayter was born in Shaftesbury, Dorset on 23rd July 1887 and baptised at St. James Church on 4th September 1887, the son of William Hayter and Elizabeth Hayter (née Padfield). In 1911 the family lived at 30 St. James, Shaftesbury and Robert was employed as a Coach Painter. He married Florence Elizabeth Gamlin on 13th Mar 1913 and they went on to have at least two children. He enlisted on 10th December 1915 and was mobilized on 29th March 1916, joining the Devonshire Light Infantry as a Private (Service No. 23840) with whom he served in France. He was later transferred to the Labour Corps (Service No. 144607) and served with the 640th and 182nd Companies. He was demobilized on 9th June 1919 and awarded the Victory and British medals. By the 1939 Register, Robert and family were living at 310 Higher Blandford Road, Shaftesbury and he was employed as a Postman. He died in September 1957 and was buried in St. Rumbold Churchyard, Cann, Shaftesbury, on 7th September 1957.

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East Knoyle 1

George Garrett

Surname: Garrett
Other names: George
Other people in this story:
John Garrett
Mary Ann Garrett née Maidment
Ann Garrett née Venning
Locations in this story:
Summerleaze Farm, East Knoyle, Wiltshire
Egypt
France & Flanders
Newton Abbott, Devon
The Holloway, East Knoyle, Wiltshire

Story:
George Garrett was born at East Knoyle, Wiltshire in 1870, the son of John Garrett and Mary Ann Garrett (née Maidment). The family lived at Summerleaze Farm, East Knoyle, Wiltshire until George's father died in 1890. Following this, his mother moved to The Holloway, East Knoyle, Wiltshire, where she is recorded still living in the 1911 Census. George married Ann Venning on 14th September 1889 and there were 2 children of the marriage. George had previously served for a period in the Royal Garrison Artillery and had spent some time in Egypt. He re-enlisted on 2nd September 1914 and joined the 1st Service Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment (Special Reservists) where he eventually became a Lance Sergeant (Service No. 7223). He was at the time living in the Newton Abbott, Devonshire, area and working as a Groom. He had served in France & Flanders and was subsequently demobilized on 19th April 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1914/15 Star. He died in 1956 in the Newton Abbott Registration District.

Source: Based on earlier research by Ken Baxter

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St. Mary's Church, East Knoyle 1

Henry James Lampard

Surname: Lampard
Other names: Henry James
Other people in this story:
William Thomas Lampard
Mary Jane Lampard neé Beal
Locations in this story:
East Knoyle, Wiltshire
Gilcombe, Bruton, Somerset
Lee Cottages, near Romsey, Hampshire
Winchester, Hampshire
Palestine
Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel
Tisbury, Wiltshire

Story:
Henry James Lampard (also known as James Henry) was born in 1898 in East Knoyle and was baptised there on 9th January, 1898. He was the son of William Thomas Lampard, a Dairyman on a Farm, and Mary Jane Lampard (neé Beal). The family were all from East Knoyle, but moved frequently, and in 1901 were living at Gilcombe, Bruton in Somerset. By the time of the 1911 Census they were living at Lee Cottages, near Romsey, Hampshire. Henry James (now referred to as James Henry) was registered at Mottisford National/Church of England (Controlled) School in 1912, along with two of his sisters. In 1913 his mother Mary Jane Lampard died at the age of 43 years.

James enlisted at Winchester as a Private in the 16th (Royal 1st Devon Yeomanry and Royal Devon Hussars) Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment (Service No. 291486). He served in Palestine and was awarded the Victory, British War medals. He was killed in action on 3rd December 1917 and was buried in the Jerusalem War Cemetery (Grave id. A.51). Although his name was recorded on the East Knoyle Roll of Honour, it does not appear on the village war memorial.

His father, William Thomas Lampard, was living in retirement in Tisbury by the time of the 1939 Register and he eventually died in 1955 aged 89 years.

Images:

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Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Semley War Memorial 2

Bertram Percival Bowles

Surname: Bowles
Other names: Bertram P.
Other people in this story:
Frank Bowles
Bessie Alice Bowles nee Trevelian
Alfred Radcliffe Bowles
Locations in this story:
Semley, Wiltshire
Mesopotamia
Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Baghdad, Iraq
Old Workhouse, Semley, Wiltshire
St. Leonard's Church, Semley
Axminster, Devon

Story:
Bertram Percival Bowles was born in Semley, Wiltshire, in 1893. He was the son of Frank Bowles, a Foreman Platelayer, and Bessie Alice Bowles (Nee Trevelian). His siblings included Alfred Radcliffe Bowles, born in 1895, who also died in the war. At the time of the 1911 Census, Bertram was single, working as a Railway Porter and living at the Old Workhouse, Semley, Wiltshire. He enlisted in Axminster, Devon, as a Private and joined the 1st/4th Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment (Service No. 2398 later changed to 200736). He served in Mesopotamia and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He died on 16th April 1918 and was buried at the Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Baghdad, Iraq (grave id. IV.C.3). He is remembered on the Semley War Memorial in St. Leonard's churchyard, and on the Roll of Honour inside the church. His name was included on the Baptist Chapel plaque, now also in the church as well as the War Memorial at Axminster, Devon.

Images:
  • Semley Baptist Chapel Plaque
  • Names on Semley War Memorial
  • Semley War Memorial 3
  • Semley War Memorial 01

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Sixpenny Handley War Memorial

Henry William Lucas

Surname: Lucas
Other names: Henry William
Other people in this story:
William Lucas
Matilda Ellen Lucas nee Long
Locations in this story:
Andover, Hampsire
France & Flanders
St. Mary's Churchyard, Sixpenny Handley, Dorset
Sixpenny Handley, Dorset
Bagthorpe Military Hospital, Nottingham
No.1 Australian General Hospital, Rouen, France

Story:
Henry William Lucas was born in 1887 in Sixpenny Handley and baptised there on 18th February, 1887. He was the son of William Lucas, a Road Contractor, and Matilda Ellen Lucas (nee Long). At the time of the 1911 Census he was single, working as a Road Labourer and living at Sixpenny Handley, Dorset. He enlisted in Andover, Hampshire, as a Private in the Princess Charlotte of Wales's (Royal Berkshire) Regiment (Service No. 29052). At a later date he transferred to the Devonshire Regiment (Service No. 17448) and finally to the 194th Company of the Labour Corps (Service No. 17448). He served in France & Flanders and was wounded in action and initially admitted to the No.1 Australian General Hospital, Rouen, France and then repatriated to the Bagthorpe Military Hospital, Nottingham, where he died on 15th November 1917. He was buried in the north west part of St. Mary's Churchyard, Sixpenny Handley, on 19th November, 1917. He is remembered on the Sixpenny Handley War Memorial.

Images:
  • Sixpenny Handley War Memorial
  • Sixpenny Handley War Memorial
  • Sixpenny Handley War Memorial

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Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Names on Fontmell Magna War Memorial 1

Percy George Barnes

Surname: Barnes
Other names: Percy George
Other people in this story:
George Joseph Barnes
Emily Ann Barnes nee Tuffin
Locations in this story:
Fontmell Magna, Dorset
Arras, France
Duisans British Cemetery, Etrun, France
West Street, Fontmell Magna, Dorset
France
Gillingham, Dorset

Story:
Percy George Barnes was born in 1892 in Fontmell Magna, Dorset. He was the son of George Joseph Barnes, (known a Joseph), an Estate Labourer, and Emily Ann Barnes (nee Tuffin). At the time of the 1911 Census he was single, working as a Barman and living at 54 West Street, Fontmell Magna. He enlisted in Gillingham, Dorset, on 8th September, 1914. He joined the 6th Service Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment (Service No. 10851) and was posted to the home depot where he rose rapidly from Private to Sergeant in the space of a few months. On the 12th February, 1917, he transferred to the Labour Corps (Service No. 54595) and was posted to France on 8th March, 1917, where he eventually joined the 169th Company of the Labour Corps with yet another Service No. 100803. His death on 31st July, 1917 was caused by an accident which happened a few days before, on the 27th July, 1917, when he was thrown off his cycle by a runaway horse and received injuries from which he did not recover. It was later stated at the inquiry that Sergeant Barnes was in no way to blame for the accident. He was awarded the Victory, British War and 1915 Star medals. He died at the 19th Casualty Clearing Station in Arras on 31st July 1917 and was buried at Duisans British War Cemetery, Etrun, France (grave id. V.A.52). He is remembered on the Fontmell Magna War Memorial, Shaftesbury.

Images:
  • Names on Fontmell Magna War Memorial 4
  • Fontmell Magna War Memorial 4
  • Fontmell Magna War Memorial 1

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
East Knoyle War Memorial

George Heremon Wyndham

Surname: Wyndham
Other names: George Heremon
Other people in this story:
Guy Percy Wyndham
Edwina Virginia Joanna Wyndham nee Fitzpatrick
Locations in this story:
Chelsea, London
France & Flanders
Dranouter Churchyard, Heuvelland, West Flanders, Belgium
Wellington College, Crowthorne, Berkshire
Clouds House, East Knoyle, Wiltshire
Magdalen College, Cambridge
Cranley Gardens, Kensington, London
Ypres Salient, Belgium

Story:
George Heremon Wyndham was born on 25th October, 1893, in Chelsea, London, and baptised at St. Peter's Church, Cranley Gardens, Kensington, London, on 27th November, 1893. He was the son of Lt. Col. Guy Percy Wyndham and Edwina Virginia Joanna Wyndham (nee Fitzpatrick). At the time of the 1911 Census, he was a student boarding at Wellington College, Crowthorne, Berkshire. At this time the family were living at Clouds House, East Knoyle, even though George's father spent time abroad as Military Attache in St. Petersburg, Russia. George later went on to Magdalen College, Cambridge. He enlisted in the 3rd Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment and also was attached to the 2nd Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers. He served in France & Flanders. and at the time of his death held the rank of 2nd Lieutenant. He was awarded the Victory, British War and 1915 Star medals. He was killed in action on 24th March 1915 whilst serving with the Fusiliers on the Ypres Salient. He was buried at Dranouter Churchyard, Heuvelland, West Flanders, Belgium (grave id. II.B.16). He is remembered on the East Knoyle War Memorial as well as the Rolls of Honour at Wellington College and Magdalen College.

Images:
  • Names on East Knoyle War Memorial

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives