Enmore Green, The Knapp

Alfred John Brickell

Surname: Brickell
Other names: Alfred John
Other people in this story:
Thomas Brickell
Elizabeth Brickell née Wilkins
Agnes Brickell née Pugh
Fredrick James Brickell
Locations in this story:
Enmore Green, Motcombe, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Tredegar, Monmouthshire, South Wales
France & Flanders
Klein-Vierstraat British Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Bedwelty, Monmouthshire, South Wales.

Story:
Alfred John Brickell was born in Enmore Green, in the parish of Motcombe, Shaftesbury, Dorset, in 1886, the son of Thomas Brickell and Elizabeth Brickell (née Wilkins).  He lived his first few years in Enmore Green until the family moved to South Wales for work in the mines.  They lived in Bedwelty and Tredegar, Monmouthshire.  Alfred married Agnes Pugh in Bedwelty, Monmouthshire, in 1913.  He enlisted and joined the Monmouthsire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 2176) and later transferred to the 9th Battalion of the Welsh Regiment (Service No. 53708) rising to the rank of Lance Sergeant.  He was killed in action in Flanders on 7th June 1917.  He was buried at the Klein-Vierstraat British Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium, (Grave Ref: II.B.23) and is remembered on the Tredegar War Memorial in the grounds of Bedwellty House and Park, Tredegar. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1915 Star.

Alfred's older brother Frederick James (b.1884) also served with Monmouthshire Regiment during the war, and like his brother, transferred to the Welsh Regiment.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
Frederick James Brickell
The National Archives
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
Enmore Green, The Knapp

Frederick James Brickell

Surname: Brickell
Other names: Frederick James
Other people in this story:
Thomas Brickell
Elizabeth Brickell née Hoskins
Alfred John Brickell
Locations in this story:
Enmore Green, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Tredegar, Monmouthshire
France & Flanders

Story:
Frederick James Brickell was born in Enmore Green, Shaftesbury, Dorset, (Parish of Motcombe) on 5th April 1884 the son of Thomas Brickell and Elizabeth Brickell (née Hoskins).  He spent a very short time of his early life in Enmore Green before the family moved to Tredegar, Monmouthshire, where his father obtained work in the coal mines.  Though the record cannot be found, Frederick, now a miner himself, had obviously married prior to 1906 as he is credited with three children born between 1906 and 1919. 

He enlisted on 1st September 1914 as a Private with the 1/3rd Battalion of the Monmouthshire Regiment (Service No. 2128).  He served in France where he was gassed on three occasions during 1915 and also received a gunshot wound in his left arm.  He was transferred to the 4th Reserve Battalion of the Welsh Regiment on 21st September 1916 (Service No. 53750).  He soon joined the 9th Battalion in the field.  During 1918 he was accused of desertion but this was dealt with by forfeiture of pay and bonuses and no trial was held. 

He was discharged on 7th January 1919 and awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1915 Star.  He made a claim for a pension in 1919 due to the gassing and the gunshot wound that had previously occurred.  After a considerable number of medicals he was awarded a limited pension.  His address at the time was 56 York Terrace, Tredegar, Monmouthshire, in which town  he eventually died on 1st December 1959.

Frederick's younger brother Alfred John (b.1886) also enlisted with the Monmouthshire Regiment and transferred to the Welsh Regiment, but he sadly died in Flanders in 1917.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Alfred John Brickell

Henry Charles Lampard

Surname: Lampard
Other names: Henry Charles
Other people in this story:
Arthur Lampard
Anna Eliza Lampard née Lush
Ada Louisa Lampard née Ashby
Col. Henry Crompton-Roberts
Locations in this story:
Street Lane Cottages, Sedgehill, Wiltshire
Grosvenor Street, Hanover Square, London
Pontrilas, Herefordshire
Notting Hill, London
France & Flanders
Ploegsteert Memorial, Hainault, Belgium

Story:
Henry Charles Lampard was born in Sedgehill, Wiltshire, in 1893, the son of Arthur Lampard and Anna Eliza Lampard (née Lush).  He lived his early life with his parents at 1 Street Lane Cottages, Sedgehill, Wiltshire.  By 1911 he had moved to 7, Grosvenor Street, St. George, Hanover Square, London, employed as a servant to the family of Col. Henry Crompton-Roberts.  He enlisted on 17th November 1915 and was mobilized on 8th February 1916 joining the 48th Provisional Battalion of the Herefordshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 4279).  He married Ada Louisa Ashby on 3rd June 1916 at St. Peter, Notting Hill, London. There were no children of the marriage.  He was transferred to the 4th Battalion of the Monmouthshire Regiment (Service No. 315217).  He was killed in action in Belgium on 12th April 1918 and is remembered on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Hainaut, Belgium.  He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
St. James from the church tower

George Roberts

Surname: Roberts
Other names: George
Other people in this story:
James Roberts
Emma Jane Roberts née Lane
Margreta Roberts née Deacon
James Roberts (Junior)
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury, Dorset
Kings Head Road, Abertillery, Monmouthshire, Wales
Bedwellty, Monmouthshire, Wales
Layton Lane, St. James, Shaftesbury

Story:
George Roberts was born in Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 20th April 1887, the son of James Roberts and Emma Jane Roberts (née Lane).  He lived his early life in Layton Lane, Shaftesbury.   By 1909 he had moved to Abertillery, Monmouthshire, to work as a Collier and had served two years with the South Wales Borderers (3rd Volunteer Battalion) on a Territorial basis.   On 14th January 1909 he re-enlisted with the Monmouthshire Regiment (48th Provisional, 3rd Battalion) as a Territorial and he attended annual training camps (Service No. 699).  During 1910 he married Margreta  Deacon in the Bedwellty Registration District, Monmouthshire, and they went on to have four children.  He was mobilized on 5th August 1914 and served as a Private in the UK only.  He was discharged on 17th May 1916 having completed his terms of engagement.  He gave his address as 29 Kings Head Road, Abertillery.  No medal records can be found for this soldier.  By the 1939 Register he had moved to 32 Montague Street, Abertillery and was noted working as a Colliery Coal Cutter Below.  He died in 1955 in the Bedwellty Registration District. 

His older brother of James Roberts (b.1879) served with the Dorsetshire Regiment during the war.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
James Roberts
PN146

John Kimber

Surname: Kimber
Other names: John
Other people in this story:
Andrew Kimber
Emma (or Emily) Kimber née Allen
Margaret Kimber née Bufton
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury, Dorset
Newport Road, Cwmcarn, Monmouthshire
Bristol
Newport, Monmouthshire
Layton Lane, St. James, Shaftesbury

Story:
John Kimber was born in Shaftesbury, Dorset, in 1861 the son of Andrew Kimber and Emma (or Emily) Kimber (née Allen). Officially he was named Henry John but after baptism only 'John' was used. The family lived in Layton Lane, St. James, Shaftesbury. John worked as a decorator. He moved to the Newport, Monmouthshire area and married Margaret Bufton on 4th Aug 1884. There are no recorded children of the marriage. He enlisted with the 2nd Battalion of the Monmouthshire Regiment on 1st November 1903 through to his discharge to the Reserves in 1909 (Service No. 301). He held the rank of Company Quartermaster Sergeant. He had moved to 63 Newport Road, Cwmcarn, Monmouthshire by 1911 (his last known address) and from there he was re-embodied into his old Regiment on 5th August 1914. He was discharged on 29th July 1915 as being medically unfit for further service due to his age, sight problems and varicose veins. He died in Bristol in 1937.

Source: Based on previous research by Ken Baxter

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives