Donhead St. Mary Church

John Morgan Snook

Surname: Snook
Other names: John Morgan
Other people in this story:
Thomas Snook
Emma Snook née Goddard
Bertha Snook née Fisher
Morris Snook
Locations in this story:
Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire
Hong Kong
Wandsworth, London
Tisbury, Wiltshire
Lower Winchcombe, Wiltshire

Story:
John Morgan Snook was born in Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire, in 1870 and baptised there on 27th March 1870, the son of Thomas Snook and Emma Snook (née Goddard). He was living with his parents at Lower Winchcombe, Wiltshire at the time of the 1881 Census. He enlisted in the Dorsetshire Regiment on 6th May 1887 as a Private (Service No. 2373). The Army was reorganised in 1889 and he was transferred to the Royal Garrison Artillery (Service No. 63403) on 1st July 1889 with a further transfer to the Royal Field Artillery (Service No. 20501) on 23rd June 1903. He served in Hong Kong until placed on reserve. He had married Bertha Fisher on 22nd September 1897 at Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire, and they went on to have five children. By the time of Word War 1 he had moved to Wandsworth, London, where he was employed by the London County Council as a Park Keeper. He was embodied on 6th August 1914 (Service No. 1596) and posted to the 3rd London General Territorial Hospital which was based in the Royal Victorian Patriotic School buildings in Wandsworth. He was however discharged on 16th October 1914 on the grounds that he should not have been called up. No medals were awarded. He died in 1931 (Tisbury, Wiltshire, Register) at the home of his son, Morris, who lived in Donhead St. Mary. Morris was his next-of-kin following the death on John's wife in 1916.

Source: Based on previous research by Ken Baxter.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives

Norman Henry King

Surname: King
Other names: Norman Henry
Other people in this story:
Henry King
Sarah King
Nellie Mary King née Dunn
Locations in this story:
Ebbesbourne Wake, Wiltshire
Porton Down, Wiltshire
Winterslow, Salisbury, Wiltshire

Story:
Norman Henry King was born at Ebbesbourne Wake, Wiltshire, on 8th February 1893, the son of Henry and Sarah King. He enlisted on 3rd September 1914 and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery as a Gunner (Service No. 44725). He was discharged on 14th September 1914 (after only 11 days service) due to 'being unlikely to be an efficient soldier' as he only had one eye. He resumed his occupation of Farm Labourer and went on to marry Nellie Mary Dunn in 1922. They had four children. His last known address was 6 Council Houses, Winterslow, Salisbury, Wiltshire, per the 1939 Register, which shows him working as a Civil Defence Messenger at Porton Down Camp, Salisbury. He died in 1977.

Source: Based on previous research by Ken Baxter

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Donhead St. Mary Church

George Jenkins

Surname: Jenkins
Other names: George
Other people in this story:
Eli Jenkins
Sarah Ann Jenkins
Lavinia Violet Jane Jenkins née Smith
Locations in this story:
Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire
Alton, Hampshire
Sierra Leone
Richmond Gardens, Hammersmith, London
Uxbridge, Middlesex
France

Story:
George Jenkins was born on 2nd April 1874 at Donhead St. Mary, Wiltshire, the son of Eli Jenkins and Sarah Ann Jenkins. He had enlisted on 10th March 1896 and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery (Service No. 14475). He served in many parts of the then Empire, including Sierra Leone, where he was at the time the War broke out. He was posted to France for a period and then back to the UK. His career in the Army was very distinguished and after the full 21 years he was duly discharged on 10th March 1918 with the rank of Regimental Sergeant Major. Apart for the Victory and British War medals and 1915 Star he was also the holder of the Long Service & Good Conduct Medal. He married Lavinia Violet Jane Smith on 4th June 1918 in Alton, Hampshire, from which marriage there were no children. The last known address was 7 Richmond Gardens, Hammersmith, London, per the 1939 Register. George died in 1957 in the Uxbridge, Middlesex, Registration District.

Source: Based on previous research by Ken Baxter.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
East Knoyle 1

George Garrett

Surname: Garrett
Other names: George
Other people in this story:
John Garrett
Mary Ann Garrett née Maidment
Ann Garrett née Venning
Locations in this story:
Summerleaze Farm, East Knoyle, Wiltshire
Egypt
France & Flanders
Newton Abbott, Devon
The Holloway, East Knoyle, Wiltshire

Story:
George Garrett was born at East Knoyle, Wiltshire in 1870, the son of John Garrett and Mary Ann Garrett (née Maidment). The family lived at Summerleaze Farm, East Knoyle, Wiltshire until George's father died in 1890. Following this, his mother moved to The Holloway, East Knoyle, Wiltshire, where she is recorded still living in the 1911 Census. George married Ann Venning on 14th September 1889 and there were 2 children of the marriage. George had previously served for a period in the Royal Garrison Artillery and had spent some time in Egypt. He re-enlisted on 2nd September 1914 and joined the 1st Service Battalion of the Devonshire Regiment (Special Reservists) where he eventually became a Lance Sergeant (Service No. 7223). He was at the time living in the Newton Abbott, Devonshire, area and working as a Groom. He had served in France & Flanders and was subsequently demobilized on 19th April 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1914/15 Star. He died in 1956 in the Newton Abbott Registration District.

Source: Based on earlier research by Ken Baxter

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Stoney Path

William Charles Abraham Burridge

Surname: Burridge
Other names: William Charles Abraham
Other people in this story:
Charles Burridge
Alice Bessie Burridge née Wilmott
Locations in this story:
Stoney Path, St. James, Shaftesbury, Dorset
France

Story:
William Charles Abraham Burridge was born in Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 21st June 1897 the son of Frederick Burridge and Alice Bessie Burridge (née Wilmott). He enlisted on 21st October 1916 as a Gunner with the Royal Garrison Artillery attached to the R.A.E. Tank Corps serving in France (Service No. 125985).  He was demobilized on 14th October 1919 with a War Pension due to the effects of his service.  He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  He re-enlisted for a period of one year in 1921 as a Territorial with the 4th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment.  He remained single and his last known address, per the 1939 Register, was 3 Stoney Path, St. James, Shaftesbury, Dorset.  He was employed as a Gardener.  William died in 1949 and was buried at St. James' Church on 16th September 1949. Source: Based on previous research by Ken Baxter.

Images:
  • St. James' Church

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
William George Barter headstone 2

William George Barter

Surname: Barter
Other names: William George
Other people in this story:
Frederick Sidney Barter
Elizabeth Jane Barter nŽée Sims
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury
Fulham Military Hospital, London, W.8.
St. Bartholomew's Church, Sutton Waldron, Dorset
Throop Farm, Christchurch, Hampshire
France & Flanders
Iwerne Minster, Dorset
Hampstead, London
Fort Brookhurst, Gosport, Hampshire

Story:
William George Barter was born in 1895 in the registration district of Shaftesbury. He was the son of Frederick Sidney Barter, an agricultural labourer, and Elizabeth Jane Barter (nŽée Sims). At the time of the 1911 Census he was single, working as a grocer and living at Throop Farm, near Christchurch, Hampshire. He enlisted at Fort Brockenhurst, Gosport, Hampshire, and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery (Service No. 66659) and served with the Expeditionary Force in France. Moving from Battery to Battery he was eventually promoted to Bombardier and finished up with the 39th Brigade. On 29th September 1918 he returned to the UK for officer training with the Royal Air Force during which time he held a temporary commission. Shortly after his posting to RAF Flying School he contracted Cerebo Spinal Fever and was admitted to Fulham Military Hospital, Dunstans Road, London, W.8. where he died on 16th October 1918. He was buried in the churchyard to the north of St. Bartholomew's Church, Sutton Waldron, Dorset. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He is remembered on the Sutton Waldron section of the War Memorial at Iwerne Minster (the inscription gives Hampstead as his place of death.)

Images:
  • William George Barter headstone 1
  • Names on Sutton Waldron War Memorial
  • Sutton Waldron War Memorial
  • Iwerne Minister War Memorial 1
  • Iwerne Minster War Memorial 03

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Names on Fontmell Magna War Memorial 5

Thomas John Stone

Surname: Stone
Other names: Thomas John
Other people in this story:
John Stone
Eliza Elizabeth Stone nee Gale
Martha Alice Clist Stone née Chick
Cecil J. Day
Charles Henry Stone
Bertram Robert Stone
Locations in this story:
Shipton Gorge, Bridport, Dorset
France & Flanders
Artillery Wood Cemetery, Boezinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium
Parsonage Street, Fontmell Magna, Dorset
West Street, Bridport, Dorset
Fontmell Magna, Dorset
Weymouth

Story:
Thomas John Stone was born in 1890 in Shipton Gorge, Bridport, Dorset. He was the son of John Stone, an estate carpenter, and Eliza Elizabeth Stone (nee Gale). One of his siblings was brother Charles Henry (b. 1894) who also died in the war whilst Bertram Robert Stone survived the conflict. At the time of the 1911 Census John and Eliza were living in Parsonage Street, Fontmell Magna. Thomas (along with his brother, Charles,) was employed by his uncle as an ironmonger's assistant in the cycle business and living in West Street, Bridport. He married Martha Alice Clist Chick at Fontmell Magna, Dorset, on 10th March, 1916. There were no children of the marriage. He enlisted in Weymouth as a Gunner in the 111th Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery (Service No. 165818). He served in France & Flanders and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He died on 16th August 1917 and was buried at Artillery Wood Cemetery, Boezinge, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium (grave id. V.B.13). His wife went on to re-marry Cecil J. Day in 1928 and they had one daughter and lived at Brach Farm, Twyford, Shaftesbury. Thomas is remembered on the Fontmell Magna War Memorial, Shaftesbury.

Images:
  • Names on Fontmell Magna War Memorial 3
  • Fontmell Magna War Memorial 4
  • Fontmell Magna War Memorial 1

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Charles Henry Stone
Albert Brine

Albert Brine

Surname: Brine
Other names: Albert
Other people in this story:
John Brine
Louisa Brine née Prior
Frank Brine
Douglas Harold Brine
Reginald Henry Brine
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury
France & Flanders
Staglieno Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
Sherborne Causeway, Enmore Green
Enmore Green, Shaftesbury
Italy
St. John's Church, Enmore Green
11th General Hospital, Genoa

Story:
Albert Brine was born in 1887 in Shaftesbury and baptised at St. John's Church, Enmore Green on 20th February 1887. He was the son of John Brine, a contractor/haulier, and Louisa Brine (née Prior). His siblings included Frank, born in 1889, who also died in the war. Another brother, Douglas Harold (b.1895) served in the Navy before and during the war. At the time of the 1911 Census Albert was single, working as a road contractor/carter and living at the family home on Sherborne Causeway, Enmore Green. Prior to this he had enlisted with the 44th Company, 3rd Depot of the Royal Garrison Artillery (Service No. 20661). He served for three years from 9th September 1907, then went into the reserves.

He was mobilized on 11th August 1914 and served with various Batteries within the Royal Garrison Artillery until he was transferred to the Royal Engineers on 28th May 1917 (New Service No. 252577). At the time of his death he held the rank of Corporal. He served in France & Flanders and towards, the end of the conflict, was posted to Italy. Whilst there he was awarded the Bronze Medal for Military Valour by the Italian Government, an announcement of which appeared in the London Gazette on 10th September 1918. He was also awarded the Victory, British War and 15 Star medals. He contracted influenza and died on 29th October 1918 at the 11th General Hospital, Genoa. He had been attached to the 15th Brigade of the Royal Garrison Artillery, Signal Sub-Section, R.E. He was buried at Staglieno Cemetery, Piazzale Resasco, Genoa, Italy (grave id. I.D.11). He is remembered on the war memorials at Motcombe and Enmore Green, Shaftesbury.

Albert's cousin Reginald Henry Brine served in the Royal Navy during the war but sadly died in 1918 on board HMS Lion.

Source: Photographs of Albert Brine and the Brine family home on Sherborne Causeway provided by Nigel Garrett.

Images:
  • Albert Brine
  • Albert Brine Memorial Plaque
  • Brine Family home on Sherborne Causeway
  • Enmore Green War Memorial 01
  • Enmore Green War Memorial 03
  • Names on Enmore Green War Memorial
  • Names on Motcombe War Memorial 1
  • Motcombe War Memorial 4
  • Motcombe War Memorial 02
  • Motcombe War Memorial 3

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Douglas Harold Brine
Frank Brine
Reginald Henry Brine
St. John the Baptist Church, Berwick St. John 01

Frederick Sweeting

Surname: Sweeting
Other names: Frederick
Other people in this story:
William Sweeting
Sophia Sweeting nee Mead
Florence Maria Sweeting née Fairs
Mr. Lattamore
Locations in this story:
High Easter, Essex
France & Flanders
Tyne Cot Memorial, Flanders
Chalk Cottage, High Easter, Essex
Rushmore Park, Wiltshire
St. John the Baptist Church, Berwick St. John, Wiltshire
Church of St. Peter and Vincula, Tollard Royal, Wiltshire
Vine Cottage, London Road, Bolney, Cuckfield, Sussex

Story:
Frederick Sweeting was born in 1880 in High Easter, Essex. He was the son of William Sweeting, an Agricultural Labourer, and Sophia Sweeting (nee Mead). The 1901 Census shows him boarding at Vine Cottage, London Road, Bolney, Cuckfield, Sussex, where he was employed as an Under Gamekeeper. On 4th February, 1905, he married Florence Maria Fairs and lived with his parents at High Easter, Essex. They had three children: two sons and a daughter. At the time of the 1911 Census, he was working as a gamekeeper and living at Chalk Cottage, High Easter, Essex. On 11th December, 1915, he enlisted in Blandford, Dorset, as a Gunner in the 275th Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery (Service No. 91617). His enlistment papers recorded his address as Rushmore Park, Wiltshire, and his occupation as gamekeeper. He served in France & Flanders and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He died on 29th September 1917 and his name appears on the Tyne Cot Memorial (Panel 6 to 7 and 162). Following his death his widow Florence married a Mr. Lattamore and continued to live at Rushmore Park. Frederick is remembered on the memorial inside the church at Berwick St. John.

He is also remembered in Tollard Royal, on the War Memorial and on the Roll of Honour to the "men of Tollard Royal and Rushmore" inside the Church of St. Peter and Vincula in the village.  

Images:
  • Berwick St. John War Memorial
  • Tollard Royal War Memorial
  • Frederick Sweeting

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Charles Stephen King headstone 4

Charlie Stephen King

Surname: King
Other names: Charlie Stephen
Other people in this story:
Stephen King
Virtue King nee Hanks
Emily Ann King née Chapple
Bessie King nee Imber
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury
Sunderland War Hospital
Holy Trinity Churchyard, Shaftesbury
Layton Lane, Shaftesbury
Bay, Gillingham
St. James' Church, Shaftesbury
St. Peter's Church, Shaftesbury
Flanders

Story:
Charles Stephen King was born in 1888 in Shaftesbury. He was the son of Stephen King, a painter, and Virtue King (nee Hanks). His mother, Virtue, died in 1893 and was buried on 10th August, 1893. His father remarried on 28th August, 1897 to Emily Ann Chapple. On 17th October, 1909 Charlie married Bessie Imber and they had three children: two girls and a boy. At the time of the 1911 Census he was working for a railway company as a house painter and living in Bay, Gillingham, Dorset.

He enlisted on 11th December, 1915 but was not mobilized until 17th August, 1916 as a Gunner in the 237th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery (Service No. 116267) and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He received gun shot wounds to his legs in Flanders on 17th August, 1917 and was repatriated to Sunderland War Hospital where he died of septicemia on 15th September 1917. He was buried south of the church in Holy Trinity Churchyard in Shaftesbury. The name inscribed on the headstone was "C.R. KING" which differs from the name that appears on official documents. In 2018 this error was rectified with the erection of a new headstone, after a local resident contacted the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

At the time of Charles' death his wife Bessie was living at 5 Layton Lane, Shaftesbury and was in receipt of a pension for herself and family the equivalent of £1.31p. per week. He is remembered on the Park Walk and St. James’ War Memorials and on the Roll of Honour in St. James’ Church. His name can also be seen on the Holy Trinity memorial, now in St. Peter's Church, Shaftesbury.

Images:
  • Park Walk War Memorial 3
  • Names on Park Walk War Memorial 2
  • Park Walk War Memorial 1
  • Names on St. James' War Memorial 2
  • St. James' Roll of Honour
  • St. James' War Memorial
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 3
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 2
  • Holy Trinity Memorial in St. Peter's Church 1
  • Charles Stephen King original headstone
  • Charles Stephen King headstone 5
  • Charles Stephen King headstone 3
  • Charles Stephen King headstone 2

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives