Ernest Frank Young

Surname: Young
Other names: Ernest Frank
Other people in this story:
James Young
Emma Jane Young
Ida Ruth Young née Rose
George James Young
Locations in this story:
Forest Farm, Motcombe, Dorset
Ireland
Penridge Farm, Selwood, Mere, Witshire
Wincanton, Somerset
Gillingham, Dorset

Story:
Ernest Frank Young was born at Motcombe, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 10th September 1896 and baptised there on 18th October 1896, the son of James and Emma Jane Young.  James Young was a farmer at Forest Farm, Motcombe. Ernest's brother George James (b.1893) also served in the war, with the Dorset Yeomanry.

Ernest enlisted on 11th December 1915 but was not embodied until 16th May 1918.  This delay was possibly due to the fact that his father had died in 1910 and he was needed on the farm.  Eventually he was called up to join the Somerset Light Infantry as a Private (Service No. 50565).  He joined the 3rd Battalion and served only in either Ireland and the UK.  He was transferred to the Labour Corps on 14th October 1918 (Service No. 663120).  He was demobilized on 20th February 1919.  There is no medal record although one of his Service Record forms has a rubber stamp 'Medal' but nothing else.   He married Ida Ruth Rose on 22nd June 1920 in Gillingham, Dorset.  They went on to have three children.  By the time of the 1939 Register he is shown living at Penridge Farm, Selwood, Mere, Wiltshire, and was described as a Farmer.  His death is recorded at the Wincanton, Somerset, District Registry in 1969.

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George James Young
Cann and Shaftesbury from Melbury Hill

Walter Edwin Stainer

Surname: Stainer
Other names: Walter Edwin
Other people in this story:
Edwin Stainer
Martha Stainer née Foot
Laura Stainer née Clare
Locations in this story:
Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Jesty's Avenue, Broadwey, Melcombe Regis, Dorset
Weymouth, Dorset
Ireland

Story:
Walter Edwin Stainer was born in Cann, Shaftesbury, on 15th January 1879, the son of Edwin Stainer and Martha Stainer (née Foot).  He lived his early childhhood in Cann, Shaftesbury, until the family had, by 1891, moved away from Shaftesbury.  Walter married Laura Clare on 31st March 1902 in Melcombe Regis, Dorset, and they went on to have two children.  He enlisted on 3rd September 1914 and joined the 4th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 2407).  He was later transferred to the 4th (Reserve) Battalion (Service No. 200743) and again, on 30th June 1917, to the 512th Home Service Company and the 628th Company of the Labour Corps (Service No. 285747).  He served with the latter unit in Enniskillen and Londonderry, Ireland.  He was discharged on 29th March 1919.  No medal records can be found under any of the above Service Nos.    By the 1939 Register he was living at 3 Jesty's Avenue, Broadwey, Melcombe Regis, Dorset, and working as a House Decorator.  He died on the area in 1951.

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Gold Hill, Shaftesbury

Harry Walter Stainer

Surname: Stainer
Other names: Harry Walter
Other people in this story:
Albert George Stainer
Martha Rosina Stainer née Warren
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury, Dorset
Gold Hill, Shaftesbury

Story:
Harry Walter Stainer was born on 22nd September 1898 in Shaftesbury, Dorset, the son of Albert George Stainer and Martha Rosina Stainer (née Warren).  The family home was at 9 Gold Hill, Shaftesbury and Harry lived there throughout his life. He enlisted on 21st September 1916 but was not mobilized until 20th August 1917 when he joined the 34th Territorial Battalion as a Private (Service No. 8/20524).  He transferred to the 303rd Reserve Labour Company of the Labour Corps on 7th October 1917 and later, on the 17th November 1917, to the 649th Agricultural Company (Service No. 432205).  He was discharged as being physically unfit, by virtue of deformed feet, on 13th March 1919.  Whilst no medal record has been found there is an imprint on his Service Records which simply says 'MEDAL' and nothing else.  It is assumed he may have received the Victory and British War medals but the index cards are missing.  By the 1939 Register he was still living at 9 Gold Hill, Shaftesbury, with his sister. He was single and working as a Builders Labourer.  He died locally in 1962.    

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St. James' Church

Harold George Stainer

Surname: Stainer
Other names: Harold George
Other people in this story:
George Theodore Stainer
Jane Stainer née Young
Kate Mary Stainer née King
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury, Dorset
St. James, Shaftesbury

Story:
Harold George Stainer was born on the 30th September 1888 in Shaftesbury, Dorset and baptised at St. James' Church on 28th October 1888 the son of the George Theodore Stainer and Jane Stainer (née Young).  He lived his whole life, apart from during Military Service, in St. James, Shaftesbury.    He married Kate Mary King at St. James Church, Shaftesbury, on 10th October 1914.  There are no records of any children.   He enlisted on the 7th June 1916 but was not mobilized until 12th March 1917 when he joined the Devonshire Regiment (Labour Company) as a Private (Service No. 59879).  Shortly after he was transferred to the Labour Corps 3rd Reserve Battalion and was posted to the 303rd Labour Company (Service No. 290276).   On the 13th October 1917 he was transferred to the 191 Training Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps (which became the Royal Air Force on 1st April 1918) (Service No. 104964).  He held the rank of Air Mechanic II and was employed as an Aero Rigger.   He was discharged, having served the whole time in the UK, on 12th April 1919 as being unfit for further service and received the Silver War Badge.  There are no other medal records.   By the 1939 Register he was living at 18 Layton Lane, Shaftesbury, and working as a Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer.   He died in Shaftesbury on 1st April 1955 and was buried in St. James Churchyard on 6th April 1955.

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PN42

John Proudley

Surname: Proudley
Other names: John
Other people in this story:
Joseph Proudley
Mary Jane Proudley née Bown
Maud Proudley née Phillips
Locations in this story:
Enmore Green, Motcombe, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Shaftesbury, Dorset
Poole, Dorset
Old Wareham Road, Newton, Parkstone, Dorset
Salisbury, Wiltshire
Tout Hill, Shaftesbury

Story:
John Proudley was born in Enmore Green, Motcombe, Shaftesbury, in 1877, the son of Joseph Proudley and Mary Jane Proudley (née Bown).  He lived his early life on Tout Hill, Shaftesbury, until the family had moved to Poole, Dorset, by 1901.   He married Maud Phillips on 19th May 1902 and they went on to have five children.  John enlisted on 11th December 1915 and was placed on reserve.  He was embodied on 14th June 1916 and joined the 1st Garrison Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 18228).  He transferred to the 1st Garrison Battalion of the Cameron Highlanders on 29th January 1917 (Service No. 28048).  He was transferred then to the Royal Defence Corps (20th Protection Company) on 27th November 1917 (Service No. 48485).  On the 28th June 1918 he was yet again transferred to the 13th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers (Service No. 61567).  Finally, on the 4th October 1918 he ended up with the 609th Agricultural Company of the Labour Corps (Final Service No. 670018).   Having served his whole time in the UK he was demobilized on 19th March 1919 and went to live at Old Wareham Road, Newton, Parkstone, Dorset.  No Medal records have been found though his Active Service form is clearly stamped 'Medal' which indicates he was entitled.  He died in 1938 in the Salisbury Registration District, Wiltshire.

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St. James from the church tower

George Padfield

Surname: Padfield
Other names: George
Other people in this story:
William Padfield
Martha Ann Padfield née Cross
Elizabeth Padfield née Howard
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury, Dorset
Wandsworth, London
France & Flanders
Gladwyn Road, Putney, London, S.W.
Battersea, London
Egypt
India
South Africa

Story:
George Padfield was born in Shaftesbury, Dorset, in 1872 and baptised on 7th January 1872 at St. James' Church, the son of William Padfield and Martha Ann Padfield (née Cross).  He lived in the St. James, Shaftesbury, area throughout his early years.  He married Elizabeth Howard in Wandsworth, London, in 1899 and they went on to have five children.   He enlisted on 9th January 1899 and served with the 1st (Service No. 2993) and 3rd Battalions (Service No. 3/8458) of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private.   He had postings to Egypt, India and South Africa, being awarded various campaign medals.  He was discharged after serving 13 years.  He re-enlisted on 4th October 1914 and joined the 443rd Agricultural Company of the Labour Corps as a Private (Service No. 528319).  He served in France until 7th August 1917, thereafter in the UK.  He was demobilized on 6th March 1919.  He was awarded the Victory and British medals.  He went on to live at 1 Gladwyn Road, Putney, London, S.W. until his death in 1932 in the Battersea Registration District.

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Gold Hill 1

Reginald Nehemiah Love

Surname: Love
Other names: Reginald Nehemiah
Other people in this story:
George Edwin Love
Elizabeth Love née Lush
Beatrice Annie Love née Case
Locations in this story:
Gold Hill, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Hartingdon Road, Salisbury, Wiltshire

Story:
Reginald Nehemiah Love was born in Shaftesbury on 27th August 1884, the son of George Edwin Love and Elizabeth Love (née Lush).  The family lived at 3 Gold Hill, Shaftesbury.  Reginald enlisted on 13th September 1914 with the 126th Company (Horse Transport) of the Army Service Corps as Driver (Service No. T2/10040).  He married Beatrice Annie Case on 15th December 1914 in Shaftesbury and she set up home at 95 St. James, Shaftesbury.  There are no known children of the marriage.  Reginald served only a few months and was discharged on 22nd March 1915 as his services were no longer required.  He however re-enlisted on 9th September 1918 and joined the 379th Company of the Labour Corps as a Private (Service No. 535326).  He served on both occasions in the UK only and was eventually demobilized on 22nd March 1919.  There are no medal records although this was queried on his Military Records without obvious resolution.   By the 1939 Register he was living at 18 Hartington Road, Salisbury, Wiltshire, working as a Milk Tipper on a Milk Farm.   He died on 9th October 1978 in Newbridge Hospital, Salisbury, Wiltshire.

Images:
  • St. James Street junction with Tanyard Lane

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James Hunt Imber

Surname: Imber
Other names: James Hunt
Other people in this story:
Frank Imber
Mary Anna Imber née Hunt
Maria Louise Imber née Kitcherside
Mark Imber
Locations in this story:
St. James, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Southampton Lodge, Paulton Ower, Nr. Romsey, Hampshire
Ford New Road, Esher, Surrey
France & Flanders
Calvin Road, Winton, Bournemouth, Hampshire

Story:
James Hunt Imber was born in Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 4th March 1886. He was the son of Frank Imber and Mary Anna Imber (née Hunt) and brother to Mark Imber (b.1879) who died in 1915 while serving with the Household Cavalry in Ireland. They lived at 14 St. James, Shaftesbury, Dorset.  James enlisted on 10th December 1915 but was not mobilized until 12th May 1916 when he joined the Hampshire Yeomanry as a Private (Service No. 2220).  On 21st December 1916 he transferred to the 1st Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment (Service No. 33442) and served in France.  On 23rd August 1917 he was transferred to the 84th Company of the Labour Corps (Service No. 629623).   He was found to have heart and chest problems occasioned by his service in the field which led to him to receiving a 30% Pension.  He was finally discharged on 10th February 1919 being physically unfit for further duty.  He gave his address at that time as Southampton Lodge, Paulton Ower, Nr, Romsey, Hampshire - this was a Military Convalescence Hospital.  He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  

He had married Maria Louise Kitcherside in Hampshire on 8th Oct 1918 and they went on to have one child who did not survive her first birthday.  By the 1939 Register he was living at 91 Ford New Road, Esher Surrey, working as a living-in chauffeur.   He died on 30th May 1959 at his home at 20 Calvin Road, Winton, Bournemouth, Hampshire.

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Mark Imber

Frank Francis

Surname: Francis
Other names: Frank
Other people in this story:
Frederick Francis
Elizabeth Jane Francis née Moore
Ada Francis née Chorley
Locations in this story:
East Orchard, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Hailsham, Sussex
France
Sackville Gardens, East Grinstead, Sussex

Story:
Frank Francis was born at East Orchard, Shaftesbury, Dorset, on 21st September 1888, the son of Frederick Francis and Elizabeth Jane Francis (née Moore).  He spent all of his early life in and around East Orchard.  He married Ada Chorley at East Orchard on 13th April 1914 and they went on to have two children.  Frank enlisted on 11th December 1915 but was not embodied until 29th May 1916 when he joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 5805).  He was transferred to the 25th (Reserve) Battalion of the Rifle Brigade (Service No. 2134) on 26th August 1916 and again to the Royal Surrey Regiment on 5th March 1917 and, finally, to the 443rd Agricultural (134th Labour Company) of the Labour Corps (Service No. 79957).  He had served in France and was demobilized on 22nd February 1919. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.  By the 1939 Register he and his family had moved to 24 Sackville Gardens, East Grinstead, Sussex, where he worked as a Corn Merchant's Labourer.  He died in the Hailsham, Sussex, Registry area in 1963.

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George Burridge

Surname: Burridge
Other names: George
Other people in this story:
Charles Burridge
Agnes Burridge
Ellen Burridge née Sheridan
Locations in this story:
Frenchmill Lane, Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset
France
Malta
India
St. Rumbold's Church, Cann, Shaftesbury

Story:
George Burridge was born in 1874 at Cann, Shaftesbury, Dorset, the son of Charles and Agnes Burridge. The family lived in Frenchmill Lane, Cann, Shaftesbury. He had originally enlisted on 13th June 1898 with the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 5701) and had served in Malta and India. He was discharged to reserves on 12 Jun 1910. At the outbreak of war he re-enlisted on 26 Aug 1914 with the 3rd Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment as a Private (Service No. 7652). He was transferred on numerous occasions - 3rd Battalion of the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry (S/n 19923), 2nd Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment (S/n 14683), The Labour Corps (S/n 451361) and finally, the 39th Garrison Company, 43rd (G) Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers (S/n G/105488). He served in France and received gunshot wounds in July 1916. He was eventually discharged on 23rd February 1917 and was awarded the Victory and British War medals as well as the 1914/15 Star. He gave his home address then as Hawkesdene Cottage, Cann, Shaftesbury. He married Ellen Sheridan at Shaftesbury on 13th September 1917 and they had one daughter. George died in 1924 and was buried in St. Rumbold's Churchyard, Cann, Shaftesbury, on 19th June 1924.

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