Martin Edmund Maidment

Surname: Maidment
Other names: Martin Edmund
Other people in this story:
Jeremiah Maidment
Caroline Maidment
Locations in this story:
Cann, Shaftesbury
Oak Cottage, Stickmens, Wrecclesham, Surrey
France & Flanders
Thiepval Memorial, France

Story:
Martin Edmund Maidment was born on 18th November 1878 in Cann, Shaftesbury. He was the son of Jeremiah Maidment, a stone mason, and Caroline Maidment. At the time of the 1911 Census he was single, working as a bricklayer and living at Oak Cottage, Stickmens, Wrecclesham, Surrey.

He enlisted as a Private in the Suffolk Regiment (Service No. 21635) and served in France & Flanders. He died on 3rd August 1916 and his name appears on the Thiepval Memorial in France (Pier and Face 1C and 2A). He was awarded the Victory and British War medals and is remembered on the Wrecclesham War Memorial in Surrey.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
St. Mary's Church, East Knoyle 1

Henry James Lampard

Surname: Lampard
Other names: Henry James
Other people in this story:
William Thomas Lampard
Mary Jane Lampard neé Beal
Locations in this story:
East Knoyle, Wiltshire
Gilcombe, Bruton, Somerset
Lee Cottages, near Romsey, Hampshire
Winchester, Hampshire
Palestine
Jerusalem War Cemetery, Israel
Tisbury, Wiltshire

Story:
Henry James Lampard (also known as James Henry) was born in 1898 in East Knoyle and was baptised there on 9th January. He was the son of William Thomas Lampard, a Dairyman on a Farm, and Mary Jane Lampard neé Beal. The family were all from East Knoyle, but moved frequently, and in 1901 were living at Gilcombe, Bruton in Somerset. By the time of the 1911 Census they were living at Lee Cottages, near Romsey, Hampshire. Henry James (now referred to as James Henry) was registered at Mottisford National/Church of England (Controlled) School in 1912, along with two of his sisters. In 1913 his mother Mary Jane Lampard died at the age of 43 years.

James enlisted at Winchester as a Private in the Devonshire Regiment and joined the 16th Battalion (Service No. 291486). He served in Palestine and was awarded the Victory, British War medals. He was killed in action on 3rd December 1917 and was buried in the Jerusalem War Cemetery (Grave id. A.51). Although his name was recorded on the East Knoyle Roll of Honour, it does not appear on the village war memorial.

His father, William Thomas Lampard, was living in retirement in Tisbury by the time of the 1939 Register and he eventually died in 1955 aged 89 years.

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
BC workhouse edit

Sidney Frederick Gray

Surname: Gray
Other names: Sidney Frederick
Other people in this story:
Thomas John Gray
Elizabeth Gray née Gumbleton
Locations in this story:
Shaftesbury
Shaftesbury Workhouse, Breach Lane, Shaftesbury
Salisbury, Wiltshire
Mesopotamia
Gallipoli
Helles Memorial, Turkey
Portland Place, London

Story:
Sidney Frederick Gray was born in 1892 in Shaftesbury. He was the son of Thomas John Gray, a Carter, and Elizabeth Gray née Gumbleton. At the time of the 1911 Census the family were living in the Shaftesbury Workhouse in Breach Lane. Elizabeth was described as a “Washerwoman and Inmate of the Workhouse”. Sidney was single and working as a House Servant in Portland Place in London. He enlisted in Salisbury as a Private in the 5th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment (Service No. 10661). He served in Mesopotamia and was awarded the Victory, British War and 15 Star medals. He died at Gallipoli on 27th August 1915 and his name appears on the Helles Memorial (Panel 137 to 140) in Turkey.  

Images:

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
1913 Shaftesbury Grammar School Football Team

William Jeffery

Surname: Jeffery
Other names: William
Other people in this story:
James Jeffery
Elizabeth Jeffery née Lampon
Locations in this story:
Charlton, Andover, Hampshire
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Dardanelles, Turkey
Andover Cemetery, Hampshire
Chelsea, London

Story:
William Jeffery was born in 1897 in Charlton, Andover, Hampshire. He was the son of James Jeffery, a farmer and cattle dealer, and Elizabeth Lampon. “Willie” attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from November 1908 to December 1913 and he appears in the 1911 Census as a boarder at the school. He was a member of 1911, 1912 and 1913 football teams and a member of 1912 and 1913 cricket teams. In 1913 he was Head Prefect and passed the Cambridge Senior Locals Examination in July. On leaving school he returned to Hampshire to work on the family farm.

He joined the Army Service Corps soon after the outbreak of war (Service No. T4/1856030) and he appears on the Roll of Honour published in the Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine in October 1914. By March 1915 he had been promoted to the rank of Sergeant and the June edition of the magazine reported: “W.Jeffery visited the school on March 31st. Owing to an attack of mumps he was unable to sail with his regiment to the Dardanelles, and is now applying for a commission with the A.S.C.”

William received a commission and served in France as a Second Lieutenant in the 5th Rifle Brigade. The Grammar School Magazine reported: “William Jeffery was wounded in the eye and sent over to a hospital at Chelsea. For a time he made splendid progress, but had a relapse and died suddenly.” He died on 7th October 1917.  The death was recorded as a civilian death in the Chelsea Registry, but he was buried in the military section of Andover Cemetery. He is remembered on the Andover Cenotaph and on the Shaftesbury Grammar School Memorial, now in Shaftesbury School.

A "First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces" was produced by Shaftesbury Grammar School in September 1915. It shows the regiment in which William served and the date and term in which he left school. Throughout the war a hand-written list was also compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to William's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources: 

First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces, September 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, October 1914
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, March 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, June 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1917

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial
  • List of Old Shastonians 1
  • List of Old Shastonians 3
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 4

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Shastonian
1914 Shaftesbury Grammar School Football Team

Roland Goetze Innocent

Surname: Innocent
Other names: Roland Goetze
Other people in this story:
Bentley Frank Innocent
Fanny Innocent
Locations in this story:
Sherborne House, Lechlade, Gloucestershire
Burford House, Sherborne Street East, Lechlade
Auckland Road East, Southsea, Portsmouth
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Cirencester, Gloucestershire
Sailley-Saillisel British Cemetery, Somme, France

Story:
Roland Goetze Innocent was born in 1899 in Lechlade, Gloucestershire. He was the son of Bentley Frank Innocent, an auctioneer and valuer, and Fanny Innocent. In 1901 the family were living at Burford House, Sherborne Street East in Lechlade. By the time of the 1911 Census they had moved to Sherborne House in Lechlade and Roland was a boarder at 27 Auckland Road East, Southsea, Portsmouth. Roland attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from January 1912 to April 1916. While there he was a member of the 1914 football team and the 1915 cricket team. He also took part in the Dorset Inter-School Sports, winning the Hurdles in 1915 and Throwing the Cricket Ball in 1916.

On leaving school he worked in his father’s office in Cirencester. When he was of military age he joined a Cadet Flying School but after two months was transferred, for medical reasons, to an infantry regiment. He served as a Private in the Middlesex Regiment and the London Regiment (Service No. G/96705) and was posted to France in August 1918. He died on 1st September 1918 and was buried in the Sailley-Saillisel British Cemetery, Somme, France (grave id. II.J.6). He was awarded the Victory and British War medals and is remembered on the Shaftesbury Grammar School memorial in Shaftesbury School.

Throughout the war a hand-written list was compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to Roland’s name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum. 

Printed Sources: 

Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, March 1919

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 3
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Shastonian
Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial

Thomas Norman Langford

Surname: Langford
Other names: Thomas Norman
Other people in this story:
Edward Langford
Harriet S. Langford
Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 9th Earl of Shaftesbury
Charles Henry Tovey
Locations in this story:
Park End Cottage, Love Lane, Alcester, Shaftesbury
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Gillingham, Kent
Hartley Wintney, Hampshire
Tunbridge Wells, Kent
France & Flanders
Queen Mary Military Hospital, Whalley, Lancashire
Armagh Military Hospital, Northern Ireland
Langford's Lane, Shaftesbury
Holy Trinity Churchyard, Shaftesbury
Rouen, France
Bimport, Shaftesbury

Story:
Thomas Norman Langford was born in 1897 in Shaftesbury. He was the son of Edward Langford, a Veterinary Surgeon, and Harriet S. Langford. The family lived at Park End Cottage, Alcester, Shaftesbury. "Norman" attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from May 1908 and was awarded an Exhibition of £3 per annum for two years in the scholarship examinations of 1909. In 1912 and 1913 he passed the Cambridge Local Preliminary and Junior Examinations, and received a school prize for “Good Examination Work”. On leaving school in 1914 he joined the Gillingham (Kent) branch of the London, City & Westminster Bank.

On 10th December 1915, at the age of 18, he volunteered to join the Army at Hartley Wintney in Hampshire (Service No. 137554). It was not until May 24th the following year that the Attestation was approved by the Commanding Officer of the 2/5th Battalion of The Buffs (East Kent Regiment) at Tunbridge Wells. On November 28th he was posted abroad as part of the British Expeditionary Force in France & Flanders. On 26th February 1917 he received a severe gunshot wound to the neck and two days later was admitted to hospital in Rouen. He returned to the UK and on March 3rd was admitted to Queen Mary Military Hospital, Whalley, Lancashire. In July 1917 he was posted to the Royal Scots, but returned to hospital, being discharged from Armagh Military Hospital on 11th January 1918. On 17th February 1918 he was transferred to the Royal Army Medical Corps (Service No. 5940).

On 12th August 1919 Norman was honourably discharged, being no longer physically fit due to Neurasthenia attributable to his war service. He was awarded the King’s Certificate and Silver War Badge. He returned to the family home at Park House in Love Lane, where his father ran his veterinary surgery. He received the Victory and British War medals in 1922.

In his “Tales of Old Shaftesbury” Fred Long recounts: “The direct road from Bimport to Love Lane (i.e. Langford Lane) did not exist and people walked down the lane as far as the surgery and to reach Love Lane had to bear to the right across Mr. Langford’s property. His son Norman contracted T.B. whilst serving in the 1914-18 War, but whilst he was strong enough to help in the work he and his father extended Langford Lane to reach Love Lane.”

Norman died of Pulminary Tuberculosis on 5th May 1923 and was buried in Holy Trinity churchyard.

On 16th October 1923 the Memorial Hall was opened by the Earl of Shaftesbury at Shaftesbury Grammar School. The ceremony was described in the November edition of the school magazine. The headmaster Dr. Tovey “read the names of the twenty-seven old boys in whose memory the Hall had been erected, and then Lord Shaftesbury removed the Union Jack from the beautifully carved oak tablet which recorded their names.” A wreath was “put at the foot of the tablet, bearing the words “Our Sorrow and our Pride. From the Old Shastonian Club.” Next morning this wreath was placed on the grave of T.N. Langford, the only one of the twenty-seven who was buried in Shaftesbury.”

The Shaftesbury Grammar School memorial is now in the school hall at Shaftesbury School. Throughout the war a hand-written list was also compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be see next to the names of those who had died, but this is not the case with Norman, whose death had occurred more than four years after the war had ended. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum. 

Printed Sources: 
Tales of Old Shaftesbury by Fred Long, 1979

Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, October 1909
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, May 1914
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, October 1914
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1923

Images:
  • Grave of Norman Langford 1
  • Grave of Norman Langford 2
  • Grave of Norman Langford 3
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 5
  • Langfords Lane 1
  • Langfords Lane 2
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1

Links to related web content / sources:
The National Archives
Shastonian
Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial

Neils John Tunnington

Surname: Tunnington
Other names: Neils John
Other people in this story:
John Tunnington
Anna Berthine Tunnington
Locations in this story:
Ripley, Knaresborough, Yorkshire
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Church Road, Wavertree, Liverpool
Thiepval Memorial, France
All Hallows Church, Allerton, Liverpool

Story:
Neils John Tunnington was born in 1891 in Ripley, Knaresborough, Yorkshire. He was the son of John Tunnington, a domestic gardener, and Anna Berthine Tunnington, who was Danish. He attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from January 1905 to December 1908. He played for the school football and cricket teams of 1906, 1907 and 1908, captaining the cricket team in 1908. He passed the Cambridge Junior Locals in July 1907 (II Class Honours, distinguished and top boy in England in Physical Geography). After leaving school he was articled to a Liverpool firm of Chartered Accountants, and passed his final Institute of Chartered Accountants examination shortly before war broke out. He was living at 21 Church Road, Wavertree, Liverpool.

By October 1914 he had joined the King’s Liverpool Regiment (Service No. 16098) and at the time of his death held the rank of Corporal. He died at the Somme on 30th July 1916 and his name appears on the Thiepval Memorial, France (Pier and Face 1 D, 8 B and 8 C). He was also remembered on the memorial at All Hallows Church, Allerton, Liverpool. He was awarded the 1915 Star, Victor and British War medals.

His death was recorded in the Shaftesbury Grammar School magazine and his character described: “N.J. Tunnington was an old boy who kept very closely in touch with the School after he left. While here he was good at work and games, straight as a die, and a general favourite with everybody. He was a first class shot, and was “sniper” to his platoon. His commanding officer speaks of him as ‘a fine soldier, trustworthy to the utmost degree, and of great personal charm and character.’ He last visited the School on October, 1915, shortly before going out to France.”

As a former pupil his name was recorded on the Shaftesbury Grammar School war memorial, now in Shaftesbury School.  A "First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces" was produced by Shaftesbury Grammar School in September 1915. It shows the regiment in which Niels served and the date and term in which he left school. Throughout the war a hand-written list was also compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to Niels' name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum. 

Printed Sources: 

Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, October 1914
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1916
First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces, September 1915 

Images:
  • List of Old Shastonians 1
  • List of Old Shastonians 4
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 7
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Shastonian
Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 7

John William Taylor

Surname: Taylor
Other names: John "Jack" William
Other people in this story:
John William Taylor
Ann Mary Taylor née Bardsley
Gerald Bardsley Taylor
Pryce Taylor
Arnold Bradley Taylor
Pryce Thomas Taylor
Locations in this story:
Loughborough, Leicestershire
Bell Foundry House, Freehold Street, Loughborough
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Nottingham University
Canada
Hythe, Kent
Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France

Story:
John “Jack” William Taylor was born in 1885 in Loughborough, Leicestershire. He was the son of John William Taylor, a Bellfounder, and Ann Mary Bardsley. His siblings included Gerald "Jerry" Bardsley (born 1886), Pryce Taylor (born 1891) and Arnold Bradley (born 1894). The family lived at Bell Foundry House, Freehold Street, Loughborough.

“Jack” attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from September 1893 to August 1901. In the Census of 1901 he appears on the list of boarders at the school. He passed the Cambridge Preliminary and Junior exams and the London Matriculation. On leaving school he entered Nottingham University and obtained the London B.Sc. degree in 1904.

By October 1915 Jack had joined Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (Eastern Ontario Regiment) as a Private (Service No. 101041) and in June 1916 was stationed at Hythe in Kent. He was killed in action on 15th September 1916 in France and his name appears on the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais. His death came two months after that of his brother Arnold and was reported in the Shaftesbury Grammar School magazine: “The brothers Taylor were the nephews of our former Head Master, Mr. Pryce Taylor. Four of them, all sons of Mr. John W. Taylor, of Loughborough, were on active service, and in addition to the two mentioned above, a third (“Pryce”) has since received a bullet wound in the left wrist, and is now in an English Hospital.”

As a former pupil his name was recorded on the Shaftesbury Grammar School war memorial, now in Shaftesbury School. Throughout the war a hand-written list was compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to Jack's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources: 

Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, October 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, June 1916
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1916

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 10
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial

Links to related web content / sources:
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
The National Archives
Shastonian
Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial

Gerald Bardsley Taylor

Surname: Taylor
Other names: Gerald "Jerry" Bardsley
Other people in this story:
John William Taylor
Ann Mary Taylor née Bardsley
John "Jack" William Taylor
Pryce Taylor
Arnold Bradley Taylor
Locations in this story:
Loughborough, Leicestershire
Bell Foundry House, Freehold Street, Loughborough
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Nottingham University
Canada
France
Trefcon British Cemetery, Caulaincourt, Aisne, France

Story:
Gerald “Jerry” Bardsley Taylor was born in 1886 in Loughborough, Leicestershire. He was the son of John William Taylor, a Bellfounder, and Ann Mary Bardsley. His siblings included John "Jack" William (born 1885), Pryce Taylor (born 1891) and Arnold Bradley (born 1894). The family lived at Bell Foundry House, Freehold Street, Loughborough. “Jerry” attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from September 1893 to July 1902. He was captain of the cricket and football teams, and was “Champion Athlete” in 1901 and 1902. After leaving the school he entered Nottingham University and then, in 1905 went to Canada, where he remained until the outbreak of the war.

The Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine reported: “Jerry Taylor enlisted in a Canadian Infantry Battalion (31st Alberta) soon after the war broke out, and went to the front in September, 1915. He soon rose to be a sergeant, and after the Somme offensive in July, 1916, he came home and took a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment.” In 1918 he was allowed to return to Canada to visit his farm for three months. The first fortnight of September was spent in England before he returned to France.

The report continues: “On Sept. 23rd, a neighbouring battalion of the Durham L.I. applied to his regiment for three officers to go “over the top” with them next day. “Jerry” was one of the three selected, and had scarcely crossed the parapet when he was instantaneously killed by machine gun fire. He was a fine all-round sportsman, and after leaving School played regularly for the Loughborough Corinthians F.C. A magnificent figure of a man, full of life and energy, and yet so gentle and affectionate that he was beloved by all. He is the third of his brothers to die in this war, Arnold having been killed in July, 1916, and John in September, 1916, and we offer our very deepest sympathy to his father and family in their terrible losses.”

He died on 24th September 1918 and was buried at the Trefcon British Cemetery, Caulaincourt, Aisne. He was awarded the Victory and British War medals.

As a former pupil his name was recorded on the Shaftesbury Grammar School war memorial, now in Shaftesbury School.  A "First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces" was produced by Shaftesbury Grammar School in September 1915. It shows the regiment in which Gerald served and the date and term in which he left school. Throughout the war a hand-written list was also compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to Gerald's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources: 

Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, June 1918
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1918
First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces, September 1915

Images:
  • List of Old Shastonians 1
  • List of Old Shastonians 4
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 7

Links to related web content / sources:
List of Old Shastonians 1

Arnold Bradley Taylor

Surname: Taylor
Other names: Arnold Bradley
Other people in this story:
John William Taylor
Ann Mary Taylor née Bardsley
John "Jack" William Taylor
Gerald Bardsley Taylor
Pryce Taylor
Pryce Thomas Taylor
Locations in this story:
Loughborough, Leicestershire
Bell Foundry House, Freehold Street, Loughborough
Shaftesbury Grammar School, Shaftesbury, Dorset
Denstone College, Staffordshire
France & Flanders
Contalmaison, France

Story:
Arnold Bradley Taylor was born in 1894 in Loughborough, Leicestershire. He was the son of John William Taylor, a Bellfounder, and Ann Mary Bardsley. His siblings included John "Jack" William (born 1885), Gerald "Jerry" Bardsley (born 1886) and Pryce Taylor (born 1891). The family lived at Bell Foundry House, Freehold Street, Loughborough. Arnold attended Shaftesbury Grammar School from September 1902 to July 1907. After leaving the school he went to Denstone College, in Staffordshire and then joined the family bell foundry.

It was reported in the Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine in March 1915 that he had gained a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Leicestershire Regiment. He served in France & Flanders and was awarded the Victory and British War medals. He was killed in action on 11th July 1916 near Contalmaison in France. His death was reported in the Shaftesbury Grammar School magazine: “The brothers Taylor were the nephews of our former Head Master, Mr. Pryce Taylor. Four of them, all sons of Mr. John W. Taylor, of Loughborough, were on active service, and in addition to the two mentioned above, a third (“Pryce”) has since received a bullet wound in the left wrist, and is now in an English Hospital. Arnold Taylor was killed by a heavy shell which burst close to him; he had just come back to the trench after helping to bring in the wounded. A fellow-officer, in a letter to his father, says: “he was the most conscientious subaltern in the company, and his loss will sadly be felt by all of us.” Arnold, with his brother Pryce, last visited the School, Whitsun, 1915.”

As a former pupil his name was recorded on the Shaftesbury Grammar School war memorial, now in Shaftesbury School.  A "First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces" was produced by Shaftesbury Grammar School in September 1915. It shows the regiment in which Arnold served and the date and term in which he left school. Throughout the war a hand-written list was also compiled of Shaftesbury Grammar School old boys serving in the armed forces. An asterix can be seen next to Arnold's name, indicating that he had died. The board is now at Gold Hill Museum.

Printed Sources: 
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, March 1915
Shaftesbury Grammar School Magazine, November 1916
First List of Old Shastonians Serving in H.M. Forces, September 1915

Images:
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School War Memorial
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 1
  • Shaftesbury Grammar School Old Boys 7
  • List of Old Shastonians 4

Links to related web content / sources:
Shastonian
The National Archives
Commonwealth War Graves Commission